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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ECOLOGICALLY-BASED PEST MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR WESTERN COTTON Title: Sublethal Pink Bollworm (Pbw) Larval Feeding Periods on Bt Cotton Bolls: Effects on Boll Entry Attempts, Larval Development and Mortality, 2001-2003

Authors
item Henneberry, Thomas
item Jech, Lynn
item De La Torre, Theresa

Submitted to: Arthropod Management Tests
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 1, 2004
Publication Date: December 1, 2004
Citation: Henneberry, T.J., Jech, L.J., De La Torre, T.M. 2004. Sublethal pink bollworm (pbw) larval feeding periods on bt cotton bolls: effects on boll entry attempts, larval development and mortality, 2001-2003. Arthropod Management Tests 29: M3, 6 pp..

Interpretive Summary: Cottons, Gossypium hirsutum L., containing the gene that mediates production of crystalline insect toxic protein (Bt cottons) have been grown commercially in Arizona since 1996. Extensive PBW population sampling has demonstrated continuing susceptibility to Bt with averages of less than one percent seasonal boll infestations reported. In contrast, under laboratory conditions, tolerance to increasing doses of lyophilized powder made from transgenic cotton leaves increased after three generations of selection. Additionally, selections of the resistant strain by exposure to the Bt toxic protein incorporated in artificial larval diet have produced strains 300 to 3100-fold more tolerant than laboratory culture non-resistant reference strains. The difference between field and laboratory results remains unexplained.

Technical Abstract: Cottons containing the gene that mediates production of crystalline insect toxic protein (Bt cottons) have been grown commercially in Arizona since 1996. Extensive PBW population sampling has demonstrated continuing susceptibility to Bt with averages of less than one percent seasonal boll infestations reported. In contrast, under laboratory conditions, tolerance to increasing doses of lyophilized powder made from transgenic cotton leaves increased after three generations of selection. Additionally, selections of the resistant strain by exposure to the Bt toxic protein incorporated in artificial larval diet have produced strains 300 to 3100-fold more tolerant than laboratory culture non-resistant reference strains. The difference between field and laboratory results remains unexplained.

Last Modified: 10/23/2014
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