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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Genes Involved in Productive Traits in Beef Cattle

Author
item Casas, Eduardo

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: August 25, 2005
Publication Date: January 27, 2010
Citation: Casas, E. 2010. Genes Involved in Productive Traits in Beef Cattle. In: Genetics of Domestic Animals, 1st. Edition. G. Giovambattista and P. Peral-Garcia, Eds. Universidad Nacional de la Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Chapter 13. Pages 227-238. ISBN: 978-950-555-378-5.

Interpretive Summary: This book chapter reviews and describes details on the identification of regions on the chromosomes where there is evidence that genes that influence economically important traits reside in beef cattle. The regions where these genes reside are located throughout all the chromosomes. Discussion focuses on growth and carcass traits such as birth weight, weaning weight, yearling weight, slaughter weight, marbling, fat thickness, double-muscling, and meat tenderness. It also includes a detailed account of the genes that have been associated with traits of economical importance. The associations of Myostatin, Leptin, Insulin-like Growth Factor-1, Calpastatin, Thyroglobulin, DGAT1, Growth Hormone, Growth Hormone Receptor, and Calpain with growth and carcass traits are discussed. The potential for using molecular marker information to improve the evaluation of breeds is discussed.

Technical Abstract: This book chapter reviews and describes details on the identification of regions on the chromosomes where there is evidence that genes that influence economically important traits reside in beef cattle. The regions where these genes reside are located throughout all the chromosomes. Discussion focuses on growth and carcass traits such as birth weight, weaning weight, yearling weight, slaughter weight, marbling, fat thickness, double-muscling, and meat tenderness. It also includes a detailed account of the genes that have been associated with traits of economical importance. The associations of Myostatin, Leptin, Insulin-like Growth Factor-1, Calpastatin, Thyroglobulin, DGAT1, Growth Hormone, Growth Hormone Receptor, and Calpain with growth and carcass traits are discussed. The potential for using molecular marker information to improve the evaluation of breeds is discussed.

Last Modified: 9/1/2014
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