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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVING THE PRODUCTION EFFICIENCY AND SUSTAINABILITY OF MORONE SPECIES CULTURE

Location: Harry K. Dupree Stuttgart National Aquaculture Research Center

Title: Advances in Tank Culture of Sunshine Bass Fry to Fingerlings

Author
item Ludwig, Gerald

Submitted to: Global Aquaculture Advocate
Publication Type: Trade Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 23, 2005
Publication Date: July 30, 2005
Citation: Ludwig, G.M. 2005. Advances in tank culture of sunshine bass fry to fingerlings. Global Aquaculture Advocate. 8(4):56-57.

Interpretive Summary: In order to provide a year-round supply of sunshine bass fingerlings it is necessary to develop cost-effective methods to culture the fingerlings in tanks. Presently, nearly 100 per cent of them come from pond culture facilities. Use of methods developed at HKD-SNARC has increased survival of pond raised fingerlings from 10% to 35%. An HKD-SNARC scientist was the first to report tank culture of sunshine bass by using fresh-water rotifers. He also demonstrated that live feed for tank cultured fish could be obtained by harvesting zooplankton from ponds. Recently, by using high feeding levels of rotifers and brine shrimp nauplii with a range of fry stocking levels the HKD-SNARC scientist obtained the largest fingerlings (at 27 days after hatching) yet produced in tanks. Additional research to determine optimum conditions in tanks and methods of fry handling will be needed to obtain cost-effective fingerling production in tanks.

Technical Abstract: In order to provide a year-round supply of sunshine bass fingerlings it is necessary to develop cost-effective methods to culture the fingerlings in tanks. Presently, nearly 100 per cent of them come from pond culture facilities. Use of methods developed at HKD-SNARC has increased survival of pond raised fingerlings from 10% to 35%. An HKD-SNARC scientist was the first to report tank culture of sunshine bass by using fresh-water rotifers. He also demonstrated that live feed for tank cultured fish could be obtained by harvesting zooplankton from ponds. Recently, by using high feeding levels of rotifers and brine shrimp nauplii with a range of fry stocking levels the HKD-SNARC scientist obtained the largest fingerlings (at 27 days after hatching) yet produced in tanks. Additional research to determine optimum conditions in tanks and methods of fry handling will be needed to obtain cost-effective fingerling production in tanks.

Last Modified: 9/20/2014
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