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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Revegetation Guidelines for Western Montana: Considering Invasive Weeds

Authors
item Goodwin, Kim - MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Sheley, Roger
item Marks, Gerald - MONTANA STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Montana Weed Control Association
Publication Type: Government Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: November 20, 2003
Publication Date: February 13, 2004
Citation: Goodwin, K., Sheley, R.L., Marks, G. 2004. Revegetation guidelines for Western Montana: Considering invasive weeds. Montana Weed Control Association. 73 p.

Interpretive Summary: Invasive weeds threaten native plant and animal communities and alter the way ecosystems work. In order to successfully manage land threatened or dominated by invasive weeds, it is critical to establish and maintain a diverse and healthy plant community that is relatively resistant to invasion. All too often, revegetation attempts in weed infested area fail. In response, we have developed guidelines for revegatating semi-arid ecosystem, especially in western Montana. This publication is also pertinent to managers working in similar habitat types in other states. This guide provides “how to” step by step information on the process of revegetation. It includes many steps: salvaging resources, protecting key plant community components, preparing the site appropriately, reducing weed interference, designing a proper seed mix, and seeding using the most effective methods.

Technical Abstract: Revegetation is a major method for managing areas seriously infested with invasive weeds because it can be used to establish a healthy plant community that is resistant to invasion. Objectives were to help improve revegetation success by providing practical concepts and effective methods to establish as desired plant community. This process includes many steps: salvaging resources, protecting key plant community components, preparing the site appropriately, reducing weed interference, designing a proper seed mix, and seeding using the most effective methods. Establishment should be monitored to identify problems that could prevent or interfere with successful revegetation. Following establishment, proper vegetation management that favors the seeded species will be necessary. This includes the long-term maintenance of the desired plant community and deterring future establishment and growth of invasive weeds.

Last Modified: 7/24/2014
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