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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Dormancy and Sprouting

Author
item Suttle, Jeffrey

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: June 30, 2006
Publication Date: July 17, 2007
Citation: Suttle, J.C. 2007. Dormancy and sprouting. In: Vreugdenhil, D., Bradshaw, J., Gebhardt, C., Govers, F., Taylor, M.A., MacKerron, D.K.L., Ross, H.A. Potato Biology and Biotechnology: Advances and Perspectives. 1st Edition. Amsterdam. Elsevier. p. 287-309.

Technical Abstract: For an indeterminate period of time following harvest, potatoes will not sprout and are physiologically dormant. Dormancy is gradually lost during postharvest storage and the resultant sprouting is detrimental to the nutritional and processing qualities of potatoes. Because of this, sprouting results in severe financial loss to producers. Currently sprouting is controlled through the use of synthetic sprout inhibitors. The research being conducted in this lab is directed towards 1.) identifying key physiological processes that naturally regulate tuber dormancy and, ultimately, 2.) modifying these processes genetically thereby eliminating the need for artificial sprout suppression. In this review chapter, the effects of dormancy progression of the cell biology, gene expression, and endogenous hormone contents of potato tubers are summarized. It is concluded that changes in endogenous hormone content and action trigger a resumption of cell cycle activity that results in the resumption of sprout growth. A more complete understanding of the roles of the naturally occurring plant hormones in tuber dormancy regulation and the internal mechanisms controlling their synthesis and action will greatly speed the processes of improving the activity of current sprout control agents and identifying new sprout control agents/technologies.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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