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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Dweet Mottle Virus and Citrus Leaf Blotch Virus

Authors
item Krueger, Robert
item Lee, Richard
item Bash, John - UCR PLANT PATHOLOGY

Submitted to: Subtropics newsletter
Publication Type: Popular Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: March 1, 2005
Publication Date: March 31, 2005
Citation: Krueger, R., Lee, R.F., Bash, J.A. 2005. Dweet mottle virus and citrus leaf blotch virus. Subtropics Newsletter V3 No. 1, Pages 7-9.

Interpretive Summary: Dweet Mottle Virus (DMV) of Citrus was first described in the early 1960s in California. It is apparently closely allied with the recently published 'Citrus Leaf Blotch Virus' (CLBV), as there is greater than 95% homology between DMV and CLBV according to the Spanish group. CLBV reacts similarly to DMV in the Dweet indicator but also produces different symptoms in other indicators as well as causing bud union problems in some instances. CLBV has also been reported to be seed-transmitted. Due to the concern over leaf transmission, we recently surveyed all rootstocks, kumquats, and Fukumoto navels in the Citrus Clonal Protection Program Foundation Block at Lindcove Field Station, as well as all holdings in the Repository Protected Collection. The published Spanish primers were used with DMV and CLBV positive controls. All trees assayed tested negative at this writing.

Technical Abstract: ‘Dweet Mottle Virus’ (DMV) of Citrus was first described in the early 1960s in California. It is associated with particular symptoms on the ‘Dweet’ tangor indicator. Recently, the Spanish group at IVIA published a new virus, ‘Citrus Leaf Botch Virus’ (CLBV). CLBV reacts similarly to DMV in ‘Dweet’ but also produces different symptoms in other indicators as well as causing bud union problems in some instances. The Spanish group has recently published that there is greater than 95% homology between DMV and CLBV. They have also published a report of seed-transmission of CLBV, making it a concern for the nursery industry. Moreover, they have published diagnostic techniques including a PCR test. Due to the concern over leaf transmission, we recently surveyed all rootstocks, kumquats, and ‘Fukumoto’ navels in the Citrus Clonal Protection Program Foundation Block at Lindcove Field Station, as well as all holdings in the Repository Protected Collection. The published Spanish primers were used with DMV and CLBV positive controls. All trees assayed tested negative at this writing.

Last Modified: 12/21/2014
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