Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: BOVINE VIRAL DIARRHEA VIRUSES (BVDV) IN THE FEEDLOT: PREVALENCE OF PERSISTENT INFECTIONS, UTILIZATION OF DIAGNOSTIC TESTS, AND DISTRIBUTION OF BVDV SUBTYPES 1A, 1B, 2A.

Authors
item Fulton, Robert - OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Hessman, B - HASKELL CO ANIM HOSPITAL
item Johnson, B - OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Ridpath, Julia
item Saliki, J - OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Burge, Lurinda - OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Confer, Anthony - OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Payton, M - OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: American Association of Bovine Practitioners Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: September 22, 2005
Publication Date: September 22, 2005
Citation: Fulton, R.W., Hessman, B., Johnson, B.J., Ridpath, J.F., Saliki, J.T., Burge, L.J., Confer, A.W., Payton, M.E. 2005. Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) in the feedlot: prevalence of persistent infections, utilization of diagnostic tests, and distribution of BVDV subtypes 1a, 1b, 2a. In: Proceedings of the 38 Annual Convention of the American Association of Bovine Practitioners, September 22-24, 2005, Salt Lake City, Utah. p. 206-207.

Technical Abstract: Bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) represent significant pathogens for cattle. The BVDV affect several organ systems; however the respiratory tract and fetal infections receive critical attention based on disease impact and potential for reservoirs/transmission. BVDV may cause primary infection of the respiratory tract and also serve to predispose the infected bovine to bacterial pathogens such as Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, Histophilus somni, Archanobacterium pyogenes and Mycoplasma spp. Fetal infections represented by persistently infected (PI calves) are important reservoirs of infection as they are life-long shedders of virus to susceptible cattle. Respiratory diseases in the feedlot are significant based on morbidity, mortality, and economic losses. Detection and removal of PI cattle could potentially lessen the economic effect of BVDV in the feedlot. Also, current BVDV control programs utilize vaccines in the U.S., primarily those containing BVDV1a and BVDV2a strains. Research at our institution has shown that the BVDV1b subgenotype is the major BVDV strain in our diagnostic laboratory accessions. The purpose of this study was three-fold: (1) determine prevalence of PI cattle entering a feedlot; (2) to utilize and compare various diagnostic tests to identify PI cattle; and (3) to determine distribution of the BVDV1a, BVDV1b, and BVDV2a subgenotypes in PI cattle entering the feedlot.

Last Modified: 9/1/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page