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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effect of high-pressure hot water washing treatment on fruit quality, insects, and disease in apples and pears Park IV: Use of silicone-based materials and mechanical methods to eliminate surface arthropod eggs

Authors
item Neven, Lisa
item Hansen, James D
item Spotts, Robert - OR ST UNIV, MCAREC
item Serdani, Maryna - OR ST UNIV, MCAREC
item Mielke, Eugene - OR ST UNIV, MCAREC
item Bai, Jinhe - OR ST UNIV, MCAREC
item Chen, Paul - OR ST UNIV, MCAREC
item Sanderson, Peter - PACE INTERNAT'L, LLC

Submitted to: Postharvest Biology and Technology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 25, 2005
Publication Date: June 1, 2006
Repository URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10113/6901
Citation: Neven, L.G., Hansen, J.D., Spotts, R.A., Serdani, M., Mielke, E.A., Bai, J., Chen, P.M., Sanderson, P.G. 2006. Effect of a high-pressure hot water washing system on fruit quality, insects, and disease in apples and pears. Part IV: Use of silicone-based materials and mechanical methods to eliminate surface arthropod pests. Postharvest Biology and Technology. 40:230-235.

Interpretive Summary: The presence of surface arthropods on commercially processed apples and pears poses a problem when these fruits are exported to countries where there are either limits on the numbers of eggs or a total quarantine restriction against these pests. Removal of the mite and other arthropod eggs, such as European red mite and codling moth eggs, may be enhanced by the use of a surface cleaning system, such as a hot water, high pressure sprays. In addition, organosilicones, like SilWet L-77, have shown great promise in killing spider mites. It was unclear if these chemicals could also facilitate the removal of arthropod eggs from the surface of fruits. Researchers at the USDA-ARS Yakima Agricultural Research Laboratory in Wapato, WA and the Mid-Columbia Agricultural Research and Extension Center of Oregon State University determined that high pressure washing was more effective in removal of codling moth and European red mite eggs than organosilicone dips or hot water sprays. This technology will aid in the export of pome fruits where the presence of arthropod eggs can disrupt trade.

Technical Abstract: The presence of surface arthropods on commercially processed apples and pears poses a problem when these fruits are exported to countries where there are either limits on the numbers of eggs or a total quarantine restriction against these pests. Removal of the mite and other arthropod eggs, such as European red mite and codling moth eggs, may be enhanced by the use of a surface cleaning system, such as a hot water, high pressure sprays. In addition, organosilicones, like SilWet L-77, have shown great promise in killing spider mites. It was unclear if these chemicals could also facilitate the removal of arthropod eggs from the surface of fruits. We determined that high pressure washing was more effective in removal of codling moth and European red mite eggs than organosilicone dips or hot water sprays. This technology will aid in the export of pome fruits where the presence of arthropod eggs can disrupt trade.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
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