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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Development and Application of a Glassy-Winged and Smoke-Tree Sharpshooter Egg-Specific Predator Gut Content Elisa

Authors
item Fournier, Valerie - UC BERKELEY
item HAGLER, JAMES
item Daane, Kent - UC BERKELEY
item Groves, Russell
item DE Leon, Jesus
item Costa, Heather - UC RIVERSIDE
item Henneberry, Thomas

Submitted to: Biological Control
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 22, 2005
Publication Date: March 1, 2006
Citation: Fournier, V., Hagler, J.R., Daane, K.M., Groves, R.L., De Leon, J.H., Costa, H.S., Henneberry, T.J. 2006. Development and application of a glassy-winged and smoke-tree sharpshooter egg-specific predator gut content elisa. Biological Control. Biological Control 37: 108-118.

Interpretive Summary: The recent invasion of southern California by the glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS) has triggered statewide control effort. Long-term control of this pest will include the use of its natural enemies, such as predators. However, currently, very little information is available on the role of generalist predators in suppressing the different life stages of GWSS. We have developed two sharpshooter egg-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for use as diagnostic tools for predator gut content analysis. Using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), MAbs were tested against the different life stages of GWSS, smoke-tree sharpshooter (STSS), which is a close relative to GWSS, and the various life stages of 27 other arthropod species. We found that the MAbs only reacted to the egg stage of both sharpshooter species and, to a lesser extent, to the adult stage of gravid GWSS females. Moreover, both MAb-based ELISAs were more responsive to younger GWSS eggs than older ones. Laboratory trials were conducted to determine how long GWSS egg antigen remained detectable in the guts of lacewing and lady beetle predators. We found that GWSS egg antigens were detectable for up to 24 h in lacewing and 6 h in lady beetle following egg consumption. This work represents a first step towards identifying the GWSS predator complex.

Technical Abstract: The recent invasion of southern California by the glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS), Homalodisca coagulata (Say) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), has triggered statewide control effort. Long-term control of GWSS will include biological control using resident and imported natural enemies. Currently, very little information is available on the role of generalist predators in suppression of GWSS eggs, nymphs or adults. We have developed two sharpshooter egg-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for use as diagnostic tools for predator gut content analysis. Using indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), MAbs were tested against the different life stages of GWSS, smoke-tree sharpshooter (STSS), H. liturata Ball (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), which is a close relative to GWSS, and various life stages of 27 other arthropod species. We found that the MAbs only reacted to the egg stage of both sharpshooters and to a lesser extent, to the adult stage of gravid GWSS females. Moreover, both MAb-based ELISAs were more responsive to younger GWSS eggs than older ones. Laboratory trials were conducted to determine how long GWSS egg antigen remained detectable in the guts of Chrysoperla carnea Stephens (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) and Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). We determined that GWSS egg antigens are detectable for up to 24 h in C. carnea and 6 h in H. axyridis following egg consumption. This work represents a first step towards identifying the GWSS predator complex.

Last Modified: 7/25/2014
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