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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effect of Ruminal Incubation on Perennial Pepperweed Germination

Authors
item Carpinelli, Michael
item Schauer, C - N DAKOTA STATE UNIV
item Bohnert, D - OREGON STATE UNIV
item Hardegree, Stuart
item Falck, Stephanie
item Svejcar, Anthony

Submitted to: Rangeland Ecology and Management
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 21, 2005
Publication Date: December 1, 2005
Citation: Carpinelli, M.F., Schauer, C.S., Bohnert, D.W., Hardegree, S.P., Falck, S.J., Svejcar, A.J. 2005. Effect of ruminal incubation on perennial pepperweed germination. Rangeland Ecology and Management. 58:632-636.

Interpretive Summary: Perennial pepperweed is a nonnative plant that invades productive habitats such as flood meadows, riparian areas, and wetlands in most western states, where it displaces desirable forage species. Reducing the number of viable seeds transported by moving water is key to limiting the spread of perennial pepperweed. Where chemical or mechanical control of perennial pepperweed is inappropriate because of proximity to water, it may be possible to control it and reduce its seed production by grazing. However, if perennial pepperweed seeds remain viable after digestion and passage by livestock, grazing animals may introduce perennial pepperweed to previously uninfested areas via manure. The goal of this study was to determine how the viability of perennial pepperweed seed is affected by digestion by cattle and by soaking in water. Viability of seeds that were digested by cattle or soaked in water greatly increased compared to seeds that were kept dry. These results suggest that livestock that have grazed seed-bearing perennial pepperweed plants should be held on weed-free forage for about one week prior to being moved to uninfested areas. These results also suggest that controlling perennial pepperweed near waterways is critical to liming its spread.

Technical Abstract: Perennial pepperweed is a nonnative plant that invades productive habitats such as flood meadows, riparian areas, and wetlands in most western states, where it displaces desirable forage species. Reducing the number of viable seeds transported by moving water is key to limiting the spread of perennial pepperweed. Where chemical or mechanical control of perennial pepperweed is inappropriate because of proximity to water, it may be possible to control it and reduce its seed production by grazing. However, if perennial pepperweed seeds remain viable after digestion and passage by livestock, grazing animals may introduce perennial pepperweed to previously uninfested areas via manure. The goal of this study was to determine how the viability of perennial pepperweed seed is affected by digestion by cattle and by soaking in water. Viability of seeds that were digested by cattle or soaked in water greatly increased compared to seeds that were kept dry. These results suggest that livestock that have grazed seed-bearing perennial pepperweed plants should be held on weed-free forage for about one week prior to being moved to uninfested areas. These results also suggest that controlling perennial pepperweed near waterways is critical to liming its spread.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
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