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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Development of S1 Families in Garlic

Author
item Jenderek, Maria

Submitted to: Acta Horticulture Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: December 1, 2002
Publication Date: June 5, 2004
Citation: Jenderek, M.M. Development of S1 families in garlic. Acta Horticulture Proceedings. P. 637. ISHS 2004:203-206

Interpretive Summary: Although production of true seeds in garlic has been known for several years, no reports on inheritance patterns of garlic plant characteristics were reported. This work describes the development of the first generation of garlic plants and bulbs grown from true seeds derived from self-pollination (S1). From 1999 to 2001, over 500 garlic plants were self-pollinated to produce S1 progenies for genetic studies. The number of S1 seeds harvested was generally low. About 9% of the self-pollinated plants produced 10 to 73 seeds each, and only one produced 271 seeds. The seed viability averaged 8%, but the number of S1 plants established was even lower. Plant characteristics of plants of the S1 families that were different from the parents included the absence of viable pollen, the presence of yellow anthers, and different bulb size. Many seedlings either had severe leaf discolorations or truncated roots or did not grow beyond the first leaf stage. Despite the deleterious characteristics, S1 bulbs of a few families were harvested and they represent valuable materials for studies on garlic genetics.

Technical Abstract: Production of true seed in garlic (Allium sativum L. and A. longicuspis L.) has been known for several years. Although release of seed derived varieties may be nearing reality, there are no reports on inheritance patterns of plant characteristics for this species. The lack of information may be due to difficulties in producing inbred families. From 1999 to 2001, over 500 garlic plants were self-pollinated to generate S1 progenies for genetic studies. In all years, the number of S1 seeds harvested was low. About 9% of the self-pollinated plants produced from 10 to 73 seeds each, and only one produced a total of 271 seeds. The seed germination averaged 8%, and the number of S1 plants established was even lower. Phenotypic characteristics among plants of the S1 families that were different from the parents included the absence of viable pollen, the presence of yellow anthers, and the different bulb size. Many seedlings either had severe chlorophyll deficiencies or truncated roots or did not grow beyond the first leaf stage. Despite the deleterious characteristics, S1 bulbs of a few families were successfully harvested and they represent valuable materials for studies on garlic genetics.

Last Modified: 9/21/2014
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