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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Influence of Tillage System, Oilseed Species, and Insecticidal Seed Treatment on Flea Beetle, Phyllotreta Cruciferae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) Damage, Oilseed Production, and Postharvest Residue Cover

Authors
item Lenssen, Andrew
item Johnson, Gregory - MT STATE UNIV-BOZEMAN
item Blodgett, Sue - MT STATE UNIV-BOZEMAN
item Goosey, Hayes - MT STATE UNIV-BOZEMAN

Submitted to: Journal of Entomological Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 25, 2006
Publication Date: March 18, 2007
Citation: Lenssen, A.W., Johnson, G.D., Blodgett, S.L., Goosey, H.B. 2007. Influence of tillage system, oilseed species, and insecticidal seed treatment on flea beetle, phyllotreta cruciferae (coleoptera: chrysomelidae) damage, oilseed production, and postharvest residue cover. Journal of Entomological Science. 42(1):1-10.

Interpretive Summary: The influence of tillage system and imidacloprid seed treatment on flea beetle (Phyllotreta cruciferae (Goeze)) damage, oilseed production, volunteer barley density, and post harvest residue cover was determined for Polish canola (Brassica rapa L.) and yellow mustard (Sinapis alba L.). Field trials were conducted at Moccasin, Montana, USA, for 1998 through 2000. Flea beetle damage was assessed on cotyledon and first true leaf stage plants by using a numerical damage rating. Flea beetle damage was low in both tillage systems and both plant species when imidacloprid seed treatment was applied. In the absence of seed treatment, seedlings of both plant species in conventionally tilled plots usually suffered more damage than did seedlings in zero tillage plots. Canola often suffered more damage than yellow mustard. Regardless of tillage system and insecticidal treatment, seed yields were poor, although yellow mustard produced greater seed yields than canola in one year. Density of volunteer barley was greater in conventionally tilled plots. Post-harvest residue cover was greater in zero-tillage plots, but all systems easily met USDA, NRCS specifications designed to prevent soil erosion.

Technical Abstract: The influence of tillage system and imidacloprid seed treatment on flea beetle (Phyllotreta cruciferae (Goeze)) damage, oilseed production, volunteer barley density, and post harvest residue cover was determined for Polish canola (Brassica rapa L.) and yellow mustard (Sinapis alba L.). Field trials were conducted at Moccasin, Montana, USA, for 1998 through 2000. Flea beetle damage was assessed on cotyledon and first true leaf stage plants by using a numerical damage rating. Flea beetle damage was low in both tillage systems and both plant species when imidacloprid seed treatment was applied. In the absence of seed treatment, seedlings of both plant species in conventionally tilled plots usually suffered more damage than did seedlings in zero tillage plots. Canola often suffered more damage than yellow mustard. Regardless of tillage system and insecticidal treatment, seed yields were poor, although yellow mustard produced greater seed yields than canola in one year. Density of volunteer barley was greater in conventionally tilled plots. Post-harvest residue cover was greater in zero-tillage plots, but all systems easily met USDA, NRCS specifications designed to prevent soil erosion.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
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