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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Tamaricaceae

Author
item GASKIN, JOHN

Submitted to: Flora of North America North of Mexico
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: February 22, 2006
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Tamaricaceae has four genera and approximately 78 species (1 genus, 8 species in the USA flora): arid to temperate regions of Europe, Asia and Africa, especially common from the Mediterranean to central Asia. Several species of Tamarix have become naturalized in Australia, and North and South America. Tamaricaceae has traditionally been placed in the Violales, but recent molecular sequence data analyses place the family within the Caryophyllales of the core eudicots. Throughout these changes, Frankeniaceae has retained its place as sister family to Tamaricaceae, sharing many characters, including secondary chemistry and salt gland structure. Various Tamarix species have been distributed horticulturally for their ornamental and erosion control properties, especially in xeric habitats. Galls on certain species of this genus are a source of tannins, and some taxa are utilized in basket weaving and as firewood. The following chapter includes a key and species descriptions for taxa found in the USA.

Technical Abstract: Tamaricaceae has four genera and approximately 78 species (1 genus, 8 species in the USA flora): arid to temperate regions of Europe, Asia and Africa, especially common from the Mediterranean to central Asia. Several species of Tamarix have become naturalized in Australia, and North and South America. Tamaricaceae has traditionally been placed in the Violales, but recent molecular sequence data analyses place the family within the Caryophyllales of the core eudicots. Throughout these changes, Frankeniaceae has retained its place as sister family to Tamaricaceae, sharing many characters, including secondary chemistry and salt gland structure. Various Tamarix species have been distributed horticulturally for their ornamental and erosion control properties, especially in xeric habitats. Galls on certain species of this genus are a source of tannins, and some taxa are utilized in basket weaving and as firewood. The following chapter includes a key and species descriptions for taxa found in the USA.

Last Modified: 8/19/2014