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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Eastern Peach Breeders - a Top Five

Author
item Okie, William

Submitted to: HortScience
Publication Type: Review Article
Publication Acceptance Date: October 15, 2005
Publication Date: March 15, 2006
Citation: Okie, W.R. 2006. Eastern peach breeders - a top five. HortScience. 41(1):79.

Interpretive Summary: Peach breeding began about 100 years ago in the U.S. We are nearing the end of the careers of the third generation of breeders. This paper discusses the lives and accomplishments of five influential Eastern stone fruit breeders from the middle of the last century, which could be considered the second generation of breeders. They are Stanley Johnston from Michigan State University, Catherine Bailey (and Fred Hough) from Rutgers University, Franklin Correll (and Carlyle Clayton) from North Carolina State University, John Weinberger of ARS in Fresno and Fort Valley, and Ralph Sharpe from the University of Florida. The early history of each breeder is discussed in relation to their later careers. They had in common an ag background, strong work ethic, ear tuned to industry needs, and a long tenure at one place. The current generation of breeders has "stood on their shoulders" in order to advance the quality of new peach varieties.

Technical Abstract: Institutional peach breeding began about 100 years ago in the U.S. As we near the end of the careers of the third generation of breeders it is appropriate to look back at the previous generation and give credit for their contributions to fruit breeding. This paper discusses the lives and accomplishments of five influential stone fruit breeders from the middle of the last century, which could be considered the second generation of breeders. They are Stanley Johnston from Michigan State University, Catherine Bailey (and Fred Hough) from Rutgers University, Franklin Correll (and Carlyle Clayton) from North Carolina State University, John Weinberger of ARS in Fresno and Fort Valley, and Ralph Sharpe from the University of Florida. The early history of each breeder is discussed in relation to their later careers. They had in common an ag background, strong work ethic, ear tuned to industry needs, and a long tenure at one place. The current generation of breeders has "stood on their shoulders" in order to advance the quality of new peach varieties.

Last Modified: 9/22/2014
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