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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Rapid Communication: Linkage Mapping of the Mahogany (Attractin) Locus in Cattle and Pigs

Authors
item Edeal, B - UNIV NEBRASKA, LINCOLN
item Rumph, J - UNIV NEBRASKA, LINCOLN
item Mass, R - UNIV NEBRASKA, LINCOLN
item Killinger, K - UNIV NEBRASKA, LINCOLN
item Jerez, N - UNIV NEBRASKA, LINCOLN
item Elnagar, S - UNIV NEBRASKA, LINCOLN
item Mcdaneld, T - UNIV NEBRASKA, LINCOLN
item Aljumaah, R - UNIV NEBRASKA, LINCOLN
item Pithpongsiriporn, U - UNIV NEBRASKA, LINCOLN
item Nephawe, K - UNIV NEBRASKA, LINCOLN
item Martinez, G - UNIV NEBRASKA, LINCOLN
item Gladney, C - UNIV NEBRASKA, LINCOLN
item Allan, Mark
item Pomp, Daniel - UNIV NEBRASKA, LINCOLN

Submitted to: Journal of Animal Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 25, 2000
Publication Date: September 1, 2000
Citation: Edeal, B., Rumph, J.M., Mass, R., Killinger, K., Jerez, N., Elnagar, S., McDaneld, T., Aljumaah, R., Pithpongsiriporn, U., Nephawe, K., Martinez, G., Gladney, C.D., Allan, M.F., Pomp, D. 2000. Rapid communication: Linkage mapping of the Mahogany (attractin) locus in cattle and pigs. Journal of Animal Science. 78(9):2479-2480.

Interpretive Summary: The Mahogany (attractin) locus was first characterized in 1960 as a recessive coat color mutation in mice. More recently ATRN was shown to modify behavior in relation to appetite and effect metabolic rate. Thus, ATRN is an attractive candidate gene for the therapeutic intervention of obesity in mammals. Furthermore, the mapping of ATRN on cattle chromosome 13 and swine chromosome 17 provides an opportunity for further development of comparative maps.

Technical Abstract: The Mahogany locus was first characterized in 1960 as a recessive coat color mutation in linkage group V of the mouse. It was later mapped to MMU2 and renamed (ATRN) based on high homology with the attractin locus in humans. Attractin influences the balance between agonist and antagonist at receptors on melanocytes and modifies behavior and basal metabolic rate. The role of attractin as a suppressor of diet-induced obesity may portend its application as a therapeutic intervention in obesity in mammals. Furthermore, the murine ATRN locus is located in a region harboring several QTL for body weight and fatness. Thus, ATRN is an attractive candidate gene in which polymorphisms may be responsible for a percentage of genetic variation in body composition. Chromosomal mapping of the ATRN locus has only been previously reported for the mouse (MMU2, 71 cM). Thus, the current localization of ATRN in pigs and cattle provides an opportunity for further development of comparative maps. For both pigs and cattle, new breakpoints and rearrangements relative to the mouse have been identified as a result of mapping ATRN. Prediction of ATRN location in humans using comparative mapping is not conclusive. The 24-cM region surrounding ATRN on MMU2 (52 to 76 cM) harbors several genes that map to HSA2, HSA9, HSA11, HSA15, and HSA20. This comparative region is especially 'fragmented,' with at least 14 breakpoints and rearrangements existing when relating murine and human maps. However, it can be speculated that positioning of ATRN on HSA20 is more likely, given the localization of ATRN to BTA13 and SSC17 and the conservation that exists between these chromosomes and HSA20.

Last Modified: 7/25/2014
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