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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Liverwort Control in Container Grown Nursery Crops

Authors
item Newby, Adam - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item Altland, James - OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY
item Gilliam, Charles - AUBURN UNIVERSITY
item Fare, Donna
item Wehtje, Glen - AUBURN UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: September 15, 2004
Publication Date: October 4, 2005
Citation: Newby, A., Altland, J., Gilliam, C., Fare, D., Wehtje, G. 2004. Liverwort control in container grown nursery crops. Proceedings of the Southern Nursery Association Research Conference. 49:396-400.

Interpretive Summary: Liverwort is growing rapidly as a weed problem within the southern United States and one of the most difficult weeds to control in many areas of the United States. Nursery areas, such as propagation facilities, that have high fertility, high moisture and humidity, and low UV light provide favorable environments for liverwort to thrive. There are no postemergence herbicides labeled for liverwort control and hand removal is currently the only option. Two chemicals, quinoclamine, an algaecide and TerraCyte, a granular formulation of sodium carbonate peroxyhydrate provided good postemergence control of liverwort. Treatments applied as over-the-top caused minimal foliar injury to salvia, scabiosa, PJM Rhododendron, and Goldstrum rudbeckia ornamentals.

Technical Abstract: Liverwort is growing rapidly as a weed problem within the southern United States and one of the most difficult weeds to control in many areas of the United States. Conditions such as low UV light, high fertility, high moisture, and high humidity environments are conducive for liverwort to thrive. There are no postemergence herbicides labeled for liverwort control and hand removal is currently the only option. Quinoclamine, an algaecide, provided over 97% control with a single application of 25 oz ai/A for at least 14 days after treatment. TerraCyte, a granular formulation of sodium carbonate peroxyhydrate, provided good postemergence control of liverwort 2 and 14 days after treatment but was significantly lower than quinoclamine treatments. Minimal injury occurred to Salvia nemorosa L., Scabiosa columbaria L., Rhododendron 'PJM', and Rudbeckia fulgida Ait. 'Goldstrum' when treatments were applied as an over the top application.

Last Modified: 7/22/2014
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