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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Complementary Microscopy Methods Define Form and Function of Food Processing Surfaces

Author
item Arnold, Judy

Submitted to: American Oil Chemists' Society Meeting
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: September 15, 2004
Publication Date: October 3, 2004
Citation: Arnold, J.W. 2004. Complementary microscopy methods define form and function of food processing surfaces. Proceedings of the American Oil Chemists' Society Meeting. p. 35.

Interpretive Summary: Nanotechnology-based strategies have resulted in the development of improved equipment surfaces that enhance food safety. The properties of food processing surfaces make it possible to manipulate conformations for more resistance to bacterial contamination and corrosion. Imaging techniques, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microanalysis, and atomic force microscopy (AFM), were combined to engineer stainless steel surfaces that reduce bacterial contamination, biofilm formation, and corrosion during food processing. Changes in nanostructure were compared with the phenomena of bacterial interactions at interfaces. Relative differences in the surface morphology of stainless steel treatments shown by AFM corresponded by treatment with the differences in reduction of bacterial attachment shown by SEM. The effects of rouging, corrosion, and biofouling are costly industrial problems. Control of nanostructures at surface interfaces can reduce the effect of these processes.

Technical Abstract: Nanotechnology-based strategies have resulted in the development of improved equipment surfaces that enhance food safety. The properties of food processing surfaces make it possible to manipulate conformations for more resistance to bacterial contamination and corrosion. Imaging techniques, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electron probe microanalysis, and atomic force microscopy (AFM), were combined to engineer stainless steel surfaces that reduce bacterial contamination, biofilm formation, and corrosion during food processing. Changes in nanostructure were compared with the phenomena of bacterial interactions at interfaces. Relative differences in the surface morphology of stainless steel treatments shown by AFM corresponded by treatment with the differences in reduction of bacterial attachment shown by SEM. The effects of rouging, corrosion, and biofouling are costly industrial problems. Control of nanostructures at surface interfaces can reduce the effect of these processes.

Last Modified: 9/29/2014
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