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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Towards the Development of a Lure and Kill System Against Ceratitis Capitata and Bactrocera Oleae Combining Food Lures and Colored Spheres

Authors
item Katsoyannos, B - UNIV OF THESSALONIKI
item Papadopoulos, N - UNIV OF THESSALY
item Kouloussis, N - UNIV OF THESSALONIKI
item Enkerlin, W - IAEA
item Hendrichs, J - IAEA
item Heath, Robert

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: May 16, 2004
Publication Date: May 16, 2004
Citation: Katsoyannos, B.I., Papadopoulos, N.T., Kouloussis, N.A., Enkerlin, W., Hendrichs, J., Heath, R.R. 2004. Towards the development of a lure and kill system against ceratitis capitata and bactrocera oleae combining food lures and colored spheres. Meeting Abstract.

Interpretive Summary: Field experiments conducted in citrus and olive orchards in Chios, Greece, aimed in developing lure and kill systems for the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) and the olive fruit fly Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) respectively. Yellow, sticky-coated, plastic, hollow spheres (7.5 cm diam) baited with long-lasting dispensers of the food attractants ammonium acetate, 1, 4-diaminobutane, and trimethylamine (FA-3) were approximately 30 and 12 times more attractive for C. capitata females and males respectively than un-baited spheres but about 2-3 times less attractive than plastic McPhail traps and baited with the same attractants. Regarding the olive fruit fly, un-baited, red, sticky-coated spheres (7.5 cm diam) were about 3.6 times less attractive for female olive fruit flies than NuLure baited McPhail traps. However, combination of spheres with long lasting dispensers of the food attractant ammonium bicarbonate rendered them 1.1 times more attractive than NuLure baited McPhail traps. Our results suggest that the combination of long lasting dispensers of food attractants with appropriately colored spheres may result in the development of effective lure and kill systems for the Mediterranean fruit fly and the olive fruit fly.

Technical Abstract: Field experiments conducted in citrus and olive orchards in Chios, Greece, aimed in developing lure and kill systems for the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann) and the olive fruit fly Bactrocera oleae (Rossi) respectively. Yellow, sticky-coated, plastic, hollow spheres (7.5 cm diam) baited with long-lasting dispensers of the food attractants ammonium acetate, 1, 4-diaminobutane, and trimethylamine (FA-3) were approximately 30 and 12 times more attractive for C. capitata females and males respectively than un-baited spheres but about 2-3 times less attractive than plastic McPhail traps and baited with the same attractants. Regarding the olive fruit fly, un-baited, red, sticky-coated spheres (7.5 cm diam) were about 3.6 times less attractive for female olive fruit flies than NuLure baited McPhail traps. However, combination of spheres with long lasting dispensers of the food attractant ammonium bicarbonate rendered them 1.1 times more attractive than NuLure baited McPhail traps. Our results suggest that the combination of long lasting dispensers of food attractants with appropriately colored spheres may result in the development of effective lure and kill systems for the Mediterranean fruit fly and the olive fruit fly.

Last Modified: 4/18/2014
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