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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Efficacy of 1,4-Diaminobutane (Putrescine) in a Food-Based Synthetic Attractant for Capture of Mediterranean and Mexican Fruit Flies (Diptera: Tephritidae)

Authors
item Heath, Robert
item Epsky, Nancy
item Midgarden, David
item Katsoyannos, Byron - UNIV OF THESSALONIKI

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: May 16, 2004
Publication Date: May 16, 2004
Citation: Heath, R.R., Epsky, N.D., Midgarden, D.G., Katsoyannos, B. 2004. Efficacy of 1,4-Diaminobutane (putrescine) in a Food-Based Synthetic Attractant for Capture of Mediterranean and Mexican Fruit Flies (Diptera: Tephritidae). Meeting Abstract.

Interpretive Summary: Field trials were conducted in Guatemala to evaluate the importance of 1,4 diaminobutane (putrescine) in traps baited with ammonium acetate, trimethylamine and putrescine. For the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), there were no differences in percentage of females captured in coffee and citrus or in percentage of males captured in citrus with ammonium acetate and trimethylamine lures (26.4 ± 6.27%, 35.7 ± 5.35%, 37.7 ± 7.48%, respectively) versus ammonium acetate, trimethylamine and putrescine lures (36.6 ± 9.64%, 41.1 ± 5.18%, 37.1 ± 6.09%, respectively). Percentage of males captured in coffee was reduced when putrescine was not used (39.9 ± 4.34% versus 31.6 ± 5.29%). Lower percentages were captured with ammonium acetate and putrescine, and the lowest percentages were captured with putrescine and trimethylamine. When population level as indicated by capture in traps baited with ammonium acetate, trimethylamine and putrescine was considered, a higher percentage of C. capitata males were captured with all three components when 1 or more flies per trap per day were captured in coffee, and a higher percentage of females were captured when less than 1 fly per trap per day were captured in citrus. Percentage of the Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens (Loew), captured was significantly higher with ammonium acetate and putrescine, and significantly lower with putrescine and trimethylamine than in all other treatments. Results indicate that putrescine may be deleted when monitoring established populations of C. capitata, but should be used in traps used to monitor A. ludens or to detect new infestations of C. capitata.

Technical Abstract: Field trials were conducted in Guatemala to evaluate the importance of 1,4 diaminobutane (putrescine) in traps baited with ammonium acetate, trimethylamine and putrescine. For the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), there were no differences in percentage of females captured in coffee and citrus or in percentage of males captured in citrus with ammonium acetate and trimethylamine lures (26.4 ± 6.27%, 35.7 ± 5.35%, 37.7 ± 7.48%, respectively) versus ammonium acetate, trimethylamine and putrescine lures (36.6 ± 9.64%, 41.1 ± 5.18%, 37.1 ± 6.09%, respectively). Percentage of males captured in coffee was reduced when putrescine was not used (39.9 ± 4.34% versus 31.6 ± 5.29%). Lower percentages were captured with ammonium acetate and putrescine, and the lowest percentages were captured with putrescine and trimethylamine. When population level as indicated by capture in traps baited with ammonium acetate, trimethylamine and putrescine was considered, a higher percentage of C. capitata males were captured with all three components when 1 or more flies per trap per day were captured in coffee, and a higher percentage of females were captured when less than 1 fly per trap per day were captured in citrus. Percentage of the Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens (Loew), captured was significantly higher with ammonium acetate and putrescine, and significantly lower with putrescine and trimethylamine than in all other treatments. Results indicate that putrescine may be deleted when monitoring established populations of C. capitata, but should be used in traps used to monitor A. ludens or to detect new infestations of C. capitata.

Last Modified: 4/19/2014
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