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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Overview of New Developments in Trapping Systems with Emphasis in Female Attractant Studies.

Author
item Heath, Robert

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: May 11, 2004
Publication Date: May 11, 2004
Citation: Heath, R.R. 2004. Overview of New Developments in Trapping Systems with Emphasis in Female Attractant Studies. Meeting Abstract.

Interpretive Summary: Facile trapping systems for detecting, delimiting the Mediterranean fruit fly have been tested and are being used globally. However, improved trapping systems are needed for detection of other fruit flies, particularly those in the genera Anastrepha and Bactrocera. Results of studies with the Caribbean fruit fly, Anastrepha suspensa have evaluated the antennal sensitivity to chemicals released by the synthetic food-based attractant, specifically ammonia and carbon dioxide, and research is ongoing to evaluate sensitivity to other components. Several countries are also using female-biased attractant for management of the Mediterranean fruit fly as an alternative to pesticides. Field studies have been conducted in Guatemala to evaluate efficacy of bait station formulations that we have developed. Results of these studies and new avenues of fruit fly research will be presented.

Technical Abstract: Facile trapping systems for detecting, delimiting the Mediterranean fruit fly have been tested and are being used globally. However, improved trapping systems are needed for detection of other fruit flies, particularly those in the genera Anastrepha and Bactrocera. Results of studies with the Caribbean fruit fly, Anastrepha suspensa have evaluated the antennal sensitivity to chemicals released by the synthetic food-based attractant, specifically ammonia and carbon dioxide, and research is ongoing to evaluate sensitivity to other components. Several countries are also using female-biased attractant for management of the Mediterranean fruit fly as an alternative to pesticides. Field studies have been conducted in Guatemala to evaluate efficacy of bait station formulations that we have developed. Results of these studies and new avenues of fruit fly research will be presented.

Last Modified: 7/22/2014
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