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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: PRE-PLANT CROPPING AND FALLOWING EFFECTS ON SEVERITY OF PRUNUS REPLANT DISEASE

Authors
item Browne, Greg
item Trout, T - UC DAVIS PLANT PATH
item Becherer, Harold
item Mclaughlin, S - UC DAVIS PLANT PATH
item Lee, R - UC DAVIS PLANT PATH
item Gartung, J - UC DAVIS PLANT PATH
item Gillis, M - UC DAVIS PLANT PATH
item Schneider, S - UC DAVIS PLANT PATH
item Bullock, R - UC DAVIS PLANT PATH

Submitted to: Proceedings of Methyl Bromide Alternatives Conference
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: June 1, 2003
Publication Date: July 1, 2003
Citation: Browne, G.T., Trout, T., Becherer, H.E., Mclaughlin, S., Lee, R., Gartung, J., Gillis, M., Schneider, S., Bullock, R. 2003. Pre-plant cropping and fallowing effects on severity of prunus replant disease. Proceedings of Methyl Bromide Alternatives Conference.

Interpretive Summary: Almond, peach, and other commercially cultivated Prunus species are subject to replant disease (RD) when planted without precautions at orchard sites previously devoted to a closely related crop. We determined effects of short-term fallow and cover crop treatments as well as long-term cropping history on severity of RD on Nemaguard peach. In a 2003 experiment in field microplots, Nemaguard peach seedlings planted without pre-plant fumigation after removal of the almond trees on Nemaguard peach rootstock grew significantly less than those planted after pre-plant fumigation, or after culture with wheat cultivar Penewawa, or after culture with sudan grass or sudan grass followed by wheat; pre-plant fallowing without fumigation did not improve seedling growth. These results indicated that certain short-term crop rotations may be used to help prevent replant disease on Nemaguard peach rootstock. In long-term cropping / cross specificity tests in the greenhouse, relatively high percentages of root cortex necrosis occurred on grape and peach root systems grown in non-fumigated soil from grape and peach sites, respectively. Comparatively less root damage occurred on peach when it was grown in non-fumigated grape soil. Grape cuttings sustained moderate root damage in non-fumigated peach as well as non-fumigated grape soil, but severity of the damage was slightly less in peach than in grape soil. Repeat experiments in a field setting are needed to conclusively test effects of crop specificity and long-term cropping history on Prunus RD.

Technical Abstract: Almond, peach, and other commercially cultivated Prunus species are subject to replant disease (RD) when planted without precautions at orchard sites previously devoted to a closely related crop. We determined effects of short-term fallow and cover crop treatments as well as long-term cropping history on severity of RD on Nemaguard peach. In a 2003 experiment in field microplots, Nemaguard peach seedlings planted without pre-plant fumigation after removal of the almond trees on Nemaguard peach rootstock grew significantly less than those planted after pre-plant fumigation, or after culture with wheat cultivar Penewawa, or after culture with sudan grass or sudan grass followed by wheat; pre-plant fallowing without fumigation did not improve seedling growth. These results indicated that certain short-term crop rotations may be used to help prevent replant disease on Nemaguard peach rootstock. In long-term cropping / cross specificity tests in the greenhouse, relatively high percentages of root cortex necrosis occurred on grape and peach root systems grown in non-fumigated soil from grape and peach sites, respectively. Comparatively less root damage occurred on peach when it was grown in non-fumigated grape soil. Grape cuttings sustained moderate root damage in non-fumigated peach as well as non-fumigated grape soil, but severity of the damage was slightly less in peach than in grape soil. Repeat experiments in a field setting are needed to conclusively test effects of crop specificity and long-term cropping history on Prunus RD.

Last Modified: 9/1/2014
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