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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Study on Dispersal of Anoplophora Glabripennis (MOTSCH.) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) Population

Authors
item Li, Guo-Hoong - CHINESE ACAD OF FOREST
item Gao, Rui-Tong - CHINESE ACAD OF FOREST
item Smith, Michael

Submitted to: International Plant Protection Congress
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: May 15, 2004
Publication Date: July 15, 2004
Repository URL: http://www.ars.usda.gov/sp2UserFiles/Place/19260000/MTSmith/MTS_PIPPC468.pdf
Citation: Li, Guo-hong, Gao, Rui-tong and Michael T. Smith. 2004. Study on dispersal of Anoplophora glabripennis (Motsch.) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) population. p. 468. In: Proceedings of the 15th International Plant Protection Congress, Beijing, China.

Interpretive Summary: The dispersal potential of adult Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) was studied from 1999-2000 in an agro-forestry landscape composed of windrows of poplar trees in Gansu Province, China. Adult beetles were collected, individually marked and released from a central location on a daily basis. Adult beetles were then captured every 7 days for three months from 50m to 1000m (@ 100m intervals) in eight directions (N, NE, E, SE, S, SW, W, NW) from the central release location. Data were analyzed to determine the flight distance and direction, and to evaluate the effects of tree density and environmental factors on flight distance and direction. Results indicated that the number of ALB recaptured decreased with increased distance and time. The seasonal average dispersal distance was approximately 300m. However, ALB can disperse more than 2,000m, with the farthest observed dispersal distance of 2,644m occurring in 2000. There was no difference between male and female beetles in terms of dispersal distance and direction. Dispersal appeared to have a directional bias. While a close relationship between dispersal and host density was not found, meteorological factor analysis indicated that dispersal pattern was affected by wind direction. The number of recaptured adults was inversely related to wind direction, while there was no apparent relationship with wind speed, temperature and relative humidity. In other words, more beetles flew against the wind and were recaptured in the upwind direction.

Technical Abstract: Dispersal potential of adult Anoplophora glabripennis (Motsch.) was studied for two years (1999-2000) in a poplar shelter forest network in Yongjing County, Gansu Province, China. Using the mass mark-recapture method and time-series analysis enabled spatiotemporal analysis of dispersal, and evaluation of the effects of host density and environmental factors on dispersal distance and direction. Results indicated that the spatial pattern of A. glabripennis adult dispersal in the shelter forest followed a negative binomial distribution. Dispersal of A. glabripennis adults decreased with increased distance and time, and the relationship between dispersal distance and the number of recaptured adult beetles can be described by the mathematic model y = 4203.5683 x **(-1.11756). Dispersal appeared to have a directional bias. While a close relationship between dispersal and host density was not found, meteorological factor analysis indicated that dispersal pattern was affected by wind direction. The number of recaptured adults was inversely related to wind direction, while there was no apparent relationship with wind speed, temperature and relative humidity. There was no difference of dispersal direction and distance between male and female adult of A. glabripennis. Adult A. glabripennis can disperse more than 2,000m, with the farthest observed dispersal distance of 2,644m occurring in 2000.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
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