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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Cutting Hibiscus Sawfly Short: Research Shows Which Perennial Species Are Most Resistant.

Authors
item Boyd Jr, David
item Cheatham, Christopher

Submitted to: Trade Journal Publication
Publication Type: Trade Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 1, 2004
Publication Date: February 1, 2005
Citation: Boyd Jr, D.W., Cheatham, C.L. 2005. Cutting hibiscus sawfly short: research shows which perennial species are most resistant. Trade Journal Publication feb: 61-67.

Interpretive Summary: The hibiscus sawfly is a serious pest on hibiscus. A study was conducted to determine the susceptibility or resistance of twelve different hibiscus species to the hibiscus sawfly. Results indicated three species, H. acetosella, H. aculeatus, and H. grandiflora show promise as parents in a breeding program due to their resistance to feeding and oviposition by the hibiscus sawfly.

Technical Abstract: The hibiscus sawfly is a serious pest on hibiscus. Damage to hibiscus plants by the hibiscus sawfly can be devastating and susceptible cultivars can be completely defoliated in a matter of days during a large infestation. Research was conducted to determine the susceptibility or resistance of twelve different hibiscus species to the hibiscus sawfly. The hibiscus sawfly females readily laid eggs on all the hibiscus plants except for H. acetosella, H. aculeatus, and H. grandiflora. Hibiscus militaris had a few eggs and all other hibiscus plants had sawfly eggs but H. mutabilis seemed to be the most preferred hibiscus plant for oviposition. The number of larvae per leaf followed the same trend as the eggs with H. acetosella, H. aculeatus, and H. grandilfora having almost no larvae throughout the test. Hibiscus mutabilis had the highest number of larvae per leaf. Three genotypes from our study show promise in the consideration of breeding for hibiscus with resistance to the hibiscus sawfly: H. acetosella, H. aculeatus, and H. grandiflora. Future breeding programs should consider including these genotypes in order to develop new cultivars that have desirable horticultural traits and sawfly resistance.

Last Modified: 8/21/2014
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