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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Sediment Control and Erosion Research: Then and Now

Authors
item Hunt, Sherry
item Temple, Darrel
item Hanson, Gregory

Submitted to: American Society of Agricultural Engineers Meetings Papers
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: July 1, 2004
Publication Date: August 1, 2004
Citation: Britton, S.L., Temple, D.M., Hanson, G.J. 2004. Sediment control and erosion research: then and now. In: American Society of Agricultural Engineers/Canadian Society for Engineering Annual International Meeting, August 1-4, 2004, Ottawa, Canada. Paper No. 04-2114. 2004. CDROM.

Interpretive Summary: Over the past 65 years, scientists at the USDA-ARS Hydraulic Engineering Research Unit (HERU) in Stillwater, Oklahoma, have made great strides in the design and technological development of hydraulic structures and vegetated channels. From its inception, the laboratory has been well-known for its accomplishments in vegetated channel design and development of design criteria for many hydraulic structures. The research projects discussed herein are only a small representation of the research conducted at the laboratory, particularly those related to sediment control and soil erosion. The studies outlined in this document are those primarily related to vegetated waterways, soil erosion properties, and sediment control. Thousands of hydraulic structures and over a half-million miles of grassed waterways based on design criteria developed by the research scientists at HERU have shaped the landscape of the world into what it is today. Today, scientists at the laboratory remain dedicated in their study of hydraulic structures, channels, dam rehabilitation issues, and sediment control structures. The purpose of the research has been, and still is, to assist engineers in the design of safe, efficient, and economical hydraulic structures and channels.

Technical Abstract: Over the past 65 years, scientists at the USDA-ARS Hydraulic Engineering Research Unit (HERU) in Stillwater, Oklahoma, have made great strides in the design and technological development of hydraulic structures and vegetated channels. From its inception, the laboratory has gained notoriety for its accomplishments in vegetated channel design and development of design criteria for many hydraulic structures including trash racks, low-drop grade-control structures, and riprap design for rock chutes and stilling basins. Thousands of these structures and over a half-million miles of grassed waterways based on design criteria developed by the research scientists at HERU have shaped the landscape of the world into what it is today. In addition, research at the laboratory has provided field engineers with new techniques in measuring flow, soil erodibility, and controlling sediment release. Today, scientists at the laboratory remain dedicated in their study of hydraulic structures, channels, issues associated with the rehabilitation of aging watershed flood-control and multi-purpose reservoirs, and sediment control structures. The purpose of the research has been, and still is, to assist engineers in the design of safe, efficient, and economical hydraulic structures and channels.

Last Modified: 7/30/2014
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