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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Chickpea Production Guide

Authors
item Corp, Mary - OREGON STATE UNIV
item Machado, Stephen - OREGON STATE UNIV
item Ball, Daniel - OREGON STATE UNIV
item Smiley, Richard - OREGON STATE UNIV
item Petrie, Steven - OREGON STATE UNIV
item Siemens, Mark
item Guy, Stephen - UNIV OF IDAHO

Submitted to: Extension Service Bulletins
Publication Type: Government Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: December 30, 2003
Publication Date: January 1, 2004
Citation: Corp, M.K., Machado, S., Ball, D.A., Smiley, R.W., Petrie, S.E., Siemens, M.C., Guy, S.O. 2004. Chickpea production guide. Oregon State University Extension Service Bulletins EM 8791-E. Corvallis, OR: Oregon State University

Interpretive Summary: Although chickpea is an ancient crop, it is a relatively new crop to the Pacific Northwest and little is known about optimum management practices for chickpea production in the region. To address this issue, a series of agronomic studies were conducted at various locations in Oregon, Idaho, and Washington to update best management practices for chickpea production in the Pacific Northwest. Studies were conducted on new and established varieties, fungicides, seeding dates, seeding rates, fertilizer use, weed management, and harvesting methods. Because of the droughts that occurred during the study year, the early maturing, small bean types yielded better than the later maturing, large bean types. Studies conducted to determine which varieties were superior in term of yield produced inconclusive results because yields were not consistent across years or locations. Seeds treated with fungicide increased stand establishment ten fold and tripled yield. Early seeding dates produced superior yields as compared to late seeding dates. High seeding rates of 4-5 seeds/sq ft produced higher yields than lower seeding rates of 3-4 seeds/sq ft, but the gains were marginal and may not be economically advantageous given the high cost of seed. Chickpeas were found to be minimally responsive to fertilizer. Without the ability to incorporate herbicides, controlling broadleaf weeds in no-till chickpea was shown to be difficult. Using special harvesting equipment attachments were found to significantly reduce harvesting losses by over 50 percent. These findings were used to update a chickpea production bulletin that producers can use to improve the chickpea production in the Pacific Northwest.

Technical Abstract: Agronomic studies were conducted at various locations in Oregon, Idaho, and Washington to update best management practices for chickpea (Cicer arietinum) production in the Pacific Northwest. Studies were conducted on new and established varieties, fungicides, seeding dates, seeding rates, fertilizer use, weed management, and harvesting methods. Most studies were conducted over a two-year period and replicated in low, intermediate and high rainfall zones. During the drought years of the study, Desi type chickpeas yielded better than Kabuli type. Studies conducted to determine which varieties were superior in term of yield produced inconclusive results because yields were not consistent across years or locations. Inoculating seeds was found to increase nodulation and chickpea yield. Seeds treated with fungicide increased stand establishment ten fold and tripled yield. Early seeding dates produced superior yields as compared to late seeding dates. No differences in grain yield were found at 6- or 12-inch row spacing. High seeding rates of 4-5 seeds/sq ft produced higher yields than lower seeding rates of 3-4 seeds/sq ft, but the gains were marginal and may not be economically advantageous given the high cost of seed. Chickpeas were found to be minimally responsive to primary element fertilization. Controlling broadleaf weeds in direct-seeded chickpea was shown to be difficult. Metribuzin applied pre-emergence herbicide was found to be partially effective. Using double-density knife guards were found to significantly reduce harvesting losses by over 50 percent. These findings can be used to improve the viability of chickpea production in the Pacific Northwest.

Last Modified: 4/18/2014
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