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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effects of Experimental Chlorate Preparations As Feed and Water Supplements on Escherichia Coli Colonization and Contamination of Beef Cattle and Carcasses

Authors
item Anderson, Robin
item Carr, Mandy - ANGELO STATE UNIV
item Genovese, Kenneth
item Callaway, Todd
item Edrington, Thomas
item Jung, Yong Soo
item McReynolds, Jackson
item Hume, Michael
item Beier, Ross
item Nisbet, David

Submitted to: Food Microbiology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 8, 2004
Publication Date: February 6, 2005
Citation: Anderson, R.C., Carr, M.A., Miller, R.K., King, D.A., Carstens, G.E., Genovese, K.J., Callaway, T.R., Edrington, T.S., Jung, Y.S., McReynolds, J.L., Hume, M.E., Beier, R.C., Elder, R.O., Nisbet, D.J. 2005. Effects of experimental chlorate preparations as feed and water supplements on Escherichia coli colonization and contamination of beef cattle and carcasses. Food Microbiology. 22:439-447.

Interpretive Summary: Certain bacteria such as E. coli O157:H7 are important pathogens on meat products that threaten people that eat this contaminated meat. In the United States, an estimated 73,000 human infections caused by E. coli O157:H7 occur each year. Because cattle have historically been recognized as important carriers of E. coli O157:H7, a study was conducted to test the ability of a new experimental feed supplement developed in our lab to get rid of this bacterium in the gut and on the hide and carcass of cattle just before they are processed for food. Results from the study showed that administering the experimental chlorate product in the feed or water significantly reduced E. coli concentrations by as much as 100-fold or more in the gut and by up to 10-fold or more on the hide at the rump. The study further showed that even at the highest treatment levels, the experimental chlorate preparations were safe for the animals and had no negative effect on animal health. While early in the development stage, this research has the potential to provide beef producers a powerful tool to ensure continued production of an affordable, safe, high quality and wholesome meat product for the American consumer.

Technical Abstract: A study was conducted to test the effects of administering experimental chlorate preparations to cattle in their feed and (or) water on gut, hide and carcass concentrations of Escherichia coli. In the study, 64 feedlot cattle were randomly assigned to one of eight different treatments where amounts of the experimental chlorate preparations ranging from 0 to 0.05% of body weight were fed over a one to five day period and a specially prepared water treament was administered for a 12 hour period before slaughter. Results from the study showed that administering the experimental chlorate product in the feed significantly reduced E. coli concentrations by as much as 100-fold or more in the gut and by up to 10-fold or more on the hide at the rump. The water treatment reduced E. coli in the rumen of these animals, which can also be a reservoir of pathogenic E. coli O157:H7. Additionally, the study further showed that even at the highest treatment levels, the experimental chlorate preparations were safe for the animals and had no negative effect on animal health. While early in the development stage, this research may ultimately provide beef producers another tool to ensure continued production of a safe, high quality and wholesome meat product.

Last Modified: 10/23/2014
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