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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Seasonal Dispersal Patterns of Frankliniella Fusca (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) and Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Occurrence in Central and Eastern North Carolina

Authors
item Groves, Russell
item Walgenbach, James - NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV
item Moyer, James - NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV
item Kennedy, George - NORTH CAROLINA STATE

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 20, 2002
Publication Date: February 20, 2003
Citation: GROVES, R.L., WALGENBACH, J.F., MOYER, J.W., KENNEDY, G.G. 2003 SEASONAL DISPERSAL PATTERNS OF FRANKLINIELLA FUSCA (THYSANOPTERA: THRIPIDAE) AND TOMATO SPOTTED WILT VIRUS OCCURRENCE IN CENTRAL AND EASTERN NORTH CAROLINA. JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC ENTOMOLOGY. 96(1):1-11.2003.

Interpretive Summary: Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) occurs annually in most agricultural areas of the southeastern U.S. and commonly reaches damaging levels in tomato, pepper, peanut, and tobacco. Populations of viruliferous thrips that disperse into crops in late spring most likely develop on nearby weed hosts. This study was conducted to document the seasonal patterns of thrips dispersal from weeds and to further characterize the temporal patterns of primary spread of TSWV. The predominant vector of TSWV vector species captured across all locations was the tobacco thrips. The temporal patterns of tobacco thrips dispersal observed during spring seasons varied among locations in all years except 2000. Temporal patterns also varied significantly between aerial traps placed 0.1 and 1.0 m above the soil surface. Fewer total thrips were captured at 0.1 m, but thrips dispersal occurred earlier and over a greater time interval compared with 1.0 m traps. Temporal patterns of TSWV occurrence differed among locations in the spring seasons of 1999 and 2000, whereas patterns of virus occurrence were similar during the fall seasons. Patterns of tobacco thrips dispersal and subsequent TSWV occurrence were synchronous at locations in 1999 and 2000 where the greatest number of TSWV lesions was recorded. An understanding of the seasonal dynamics of thrips populations developing on and emigrating from wild hosts is essential to understanding the epidemiology of TSWV. Knowledge of the temporal patterns of F. fusca dispersal and TSWV occurrence may be a useful indicator for describing the time when susceptible crops are at highest risk of TSWV infection.

Technical Abstract: The seasonal abundance and temporal pattern of Frankliniella fusca Hinds dispersal were monitored from 1996 to 2000 at 12 locations in central and eastern North Carolina. The predominant vector of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) vector species captured across all locations was F. fusca (98%). The temporal patterns of F. fusca dispersal observed during spring seasons varied among locations in all years except 2000. Regression analysis estimated that times of first flight in the spring seasons varied among locations, whereas flight duration intervals were similar. Temporal patterns of F. fusca captured varied significantly between aerial traps placed 0.1 and 1.0 m above the soil surface. Fewer total thrips were captured at 0.1 m, but thrips dispersal occurred earlier and over a greater time interval compared with 1.0 m traps. Temporal patterns of TSWV occurrence differed among locations in the spring seasons of 1999 and 2000, whereas patterns of virus occurrence were similar during the fall seasons. Patterns of F. fusca dispersal and subsequent TSWV occurrence were synchronous at locations in 1999 and 2000 where the greatest number of TSWV lesions was recorded. Knowledge of the temporal patterns of F. fusca dispersal and TSWV occurrence may be a useful indicator for describing the time when susceptible crops are at highest risk of TSWV infection.

Last Modified: 7/25/2014
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