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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Irrigation Water Requirements of Strawberries.

Authors
item Trout, Thomas
item Gartung, Jimmie

Submitted to: Acta Horticulturae
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 1, 2004
Publication Date: December 1, 2004
Citation: Trout, T.J., Gartung, J.L. 2004. Irrigation Water Requirements of Strawberries. Acta Horticulturae. No. 664: 665-671.

Interpretive Summary: High irrigation water use efficiency requires knowing how much water a crop needs. Crop water needs can be predicted from potential evapotranspiration, measured by weather station networks, and a crop coefficient specific to each crop and growing condition. Strawberry is an economically important crop in coastal California and is grown in areas where irrigation water is scarce. Because of complex planting geometries, crop coefficients for strawberry are difficult to estimate. A field trial was carried out to determine crop coefficients based on canopy cover. Five irrigation amounts were applied to replicated plots based on measured reference evapotranspiration and canopy cover. Although the treatments (70% - 150% ETc) resulted in wide variation in irrigation amounts, soil water content increased with each irrigation level and did not indicate over-irrigation with any treatment. However, in spite of the wide variation in soil water content, strawberry growth, health, and yield did not indicate stress or a significant yield response with any treatment. Strawberry crop coefficients could not be determined from these data. This work will be continued to determine crop coefficients for strawberry.

Technical Abstract: Because of complex planting geometries, crop coefficients for strawberry are difficult to estimate. A field trial was carried out to determine crop coefficients based on canopy cover. Five irrigation amounts were applied to replicated plots based on measured reference evapotranspiration and canopy cover. Although the treatments (70% - 150% ETc) resulted in wide variation in irrigation amounts, soil water content increased with each irrigation level and did not indicate over-irrigation with any treatment. However, in spite of the wide variation in soil water content, strawberry growth, health, and yield did not indicate stress or a significant yield response with any treatment. Strawberry crop coefficients could not be determined from these data.

Last Modified: 9/3/2014
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