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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effects of Alcohol on Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I and Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein-3 in Postmenopausal Women.

Authors
item Lavigne, Jackie - NCI, NIH
item Baer, David
item Wimbrow, Heather - NCI, NIH
item Albert, Paul - NCI, NIH
item Brown, Ellen - USDA, ARS
item Judd, Joseph
item Campbell, William - NCI, NIH
item Giffen, Carol - NCI, NIH
item Dorgan, Joanne - FOX CHASE CANCER CTR
item Hartman, Terryl - PENNS STATE UNIV

Submitted to: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 22, 2004
Publication Date: February 1, 2005
Citation: Lavigne, J.A., Baer, D.J., Wimbrow, H.H., Albert, P.S., Brown, E.D., Judd, J.T., Campbell, W.S., Giffen, C.A., Dorgan, J.F., Hartman, T.J. 2005. Effects of alcohol on insulin-like growth factor-i and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 in postmenopausal women. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 81:503-507.

Interpretive Summary: The hormone insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and its receptor binding protein (IGFBP-1) have been associated with increased risk of several types of cancer, including colon, prostate and breast. Studies have suggested that alcohol may affect IGF-I and/or IGFBP-3. We therefore investigated whether chronic, moderate alcohol intake affected IGF-I and/or IGFBP-3 in a controlled, crossover feeding study. Fifty-three postmenopausal women were randomly assigned to consume 0 g (control), 15 g (one drink), or 30 g (two drinks) of alcohol daily for eight weeks. All foods and beverages were provided during the intervention. Individuals were monitored and calories adjusted to maintain constant weight. As compared to 0 g/day of alcohol, IGF-I concentrations were unchanged by 1 drink/day [0.0%, 95% confidence interval (CI) = -3.2 to 3.5%] but significantly changed by -4.9% (95% CI = -8.0 to -1.6%) with 2 drinks/day, while IGFBP-3 concentrations significantly increased 3.0% (95% CI = 0.4 to 5.6%) with 1 drink/day, but only marginally increased by 1.8% (95% CI = -0.9 to 4.5%) with 2 drinks/day of alcohol. This is the first controlled diet study to find that, in postmenopausal women, alcohol consumption reduces the amount of serum IGF-I potentially available for receptor binding when weight is kept constant. These findings suggest that the impact of alcohol intake should be considered in studies of IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and cancer in postmenopausal women. These data are important to individuals making choices about moderate alcohol consumption, scientists and physicians interested in the risks and benefits of moderate alcohol consumption and to individuals responsible for developing public health policy regarding moderate alcohol consumption.

Technical Abstract: Increased circulating insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) concentrations, frequently adjusted for IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), have been associated with increased risk of several types of cancer, including colon, prostate and breast. Studies have suggested that alcohol may affect IGF-I and/or IGFBP-3; however, controlled feeding studies to assess alcohol's effects on IGF-I or IGFBP-3 serum concentrations have not been conducted. We therefore investigated whether chronic, moderate alcohol intake affected IGF-I and/or IGFBP-3 in a controlled, crossover feeding study. Fifty-three postmenopausal women were randomly assigned to consume 0 g (control), 15 g (one drink), or 30 g (two drinks) of alcohol daily for eight weeks, and rotated through the other two intake levels in random order. All foods and beverages were provided during the intervention. Individuals were monitored and calories adjusted to maintain constant weight, and serum was collected at the end of each diet period. As compared to 0 g/day of alcohol, IGF-I concentrations were unchanged by 15 g/day [0.0%, 95% confidence interval (CI) = -3.2 to 3.5%] but significantly changed by -4.9% (95% CI = -8.0 to -1.6%) with 30 g/day, while IGFBP-3 concentrations significantly increased 3.0% (95% CI = 0.4 to 5.6%) with 15 g/day, but only marginally increased by 1.8% (95% CI = -0.9 to 4.5%) with 30 g/day of alcohol. This is the first controlled diet study to find that, in postmenopausal women, alcohol consumption reduces the amount of serum IGF-I potentially available for receptor binding when weight is kept constant. These findings suggest that the impact of alcohol intake should be considered in studies of IGF-I, IGFBP-3 and cancer in postmenopausal women.

Last Modified: 11/27/2014
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