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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Monitoring the Dynamics of Saltcedar Biological Control in Lovelock, Nevada

Authors
item Anderson, Gerald
item Knight, Jeff - NV DEPT OF AGRICULTURE
item Carruthers, Raymond
item Deloach Jr, Culver

Submitted to: Biannual Workshop in Color Photography and Videography in Resource
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: November 21, 2003
Publication Date: November 10, 2004
Citation: Anderson, G.L., Knight, J., Carruthers, R.I. 2004. Monitoring the dynamics of saltcedar biological control in Lovelock, Nevada. In: Proceedings of the 19th Biennial Workshop on Color Photography Videography and Airborne Imaging for Resource Assessment. American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, October 6-8, 2003, Logan, Utah. 2004 CDROM.

Interpretive Summary: Saltcedar is a major invasive weeds throughout the United States and Mexico. Introduced to the United States in the 1800s, the weeds infest riparian areas, displace much of the native vegetation, increase fire hazards and cause an estimated $300 million (annually) in damage to agricultural and natural ecosystems. A similar cost is estimated for water loss, flood disaster relief and control efforts. Until recently chemical and mechanical control methods were the primary techniques for treating saltcedar infestations in North America. However, in 1999 researchers from the United States Department of Agriculture released a biological control agent, the Chinese leaf beetle, in six states as the first step in effective saltcedar. This paper focuses on monitoring efforts at one of the first sites demonstrating substantial impacts by the beetles - Lovelock, Nevada. Efforts focused on the use of ground sampling and hyperspectral remote sensing to quantify the beetles impact on saltcedar.

Technical Abstract: Saltcedar (Tamarix ramosissima and T. parviflora) are a major invasive weeds throughout the United States and Mexico. Introduced to the United States in the 1800s, the weeds infest riparian areas, displace much of the native vegetation, increase fire hazards and cause an estimated $300 million (annually) in damage to agricultural and natural ecosystems. A similar cost is estimated for water loss, flood disaster relief and control efforts. Until recently chemical and mechanical control methods were the primary techniques for treating saltcedar infestations in North America. However, in 1999 researchers from the United States Department of Agriculture released a Chinese leaf beetle (Diorhabda elongata) in six states as the first step in developing a biological control program for saltcedar. This paper focuses on monitoring efforts at one of the first sites demonstrating substantial impacts by the beetles - Lovelock, Nevada. Efforts focused on the use of ground sampling and hyperspectral remote sensing to quantify Diorhabda impact, defoliation dynamics, population growth and movement within the monotypic saltcedar stands found at the site.

Last Modified: 4/18/2014
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