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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Erwinia Root Rot

Author
item CAMPBELL, LARRY

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: December 1, 2003
Publication Date: February 1, 2005
Citation: Campbell, L.G. 2005. Bacterial vascular necrosis and rot. In: Biancardi, E., Campbell, L.G., Skaracis, G.N., and De Biaggi, M. Genetics and Breeding of Sugar Beet. Enfield, New Hampshire, Science Publishers, Inc. p. 86-87.

Interpretive Summary: Erwinia root rot, also known as bacterial vascular necrosis and rot, is unusual because of the many bacterial diseases that occur on sugarbeet it is one of a few capable of causing extensive damage. Erwinia root rot of sugarbeet occurs primarily in the western U.S. The pathogen lives in the soil and is transmitted by cultivation, insects or splashing water. Erwinia root rot was recognized as an important disease of sugarbeet when two virus yellows resistant hybrids that were susceptible to Erwinia were introduced in response to the spread of virus yellows. Some cultural practices may reduce the damage caused by Erwinia root rot, but resistant varieties often are required for adequate reliable control. Erwinia resistance is controlled by a major gene and several modifying genes that affect the level of resistance. Greenhouse and field techniques are available for use in breeding programs, and resistant germplasm is available for developing commercial Erwinia resistant parental lines.

Technical Abstract: Erwinia root rot (caused by Erwinia carotovora (Jones) Bergey et al. ssp betavasculorum Thomson et al.), also known as bacterial vascular necrosis and rot, is unusual because of the many bacterial diseases that occur on sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.) it is one of a few capable of causing extensive damage. Erwinia root rot of sugarbeet occurs primarily in the western U.S. but also occasionally in Europe. The pathogen lives in the soil and is transmitted by cultivation, insects or splashing water. Erwinia root rot was recognized as an important disease of sugarbeet when two virus yellows resistant hybrids, USH9 and USH10, that were susceptible to Erwinia were introduced in response to the spread of virus yellows. Some cultural practices may reduce the damage caused by Erwinia root rot, but resistant varieties often are required for adequate reliable control. Resistance is simply inherited, with a large dominance component. A second, primarily additive component determines the amount of rot in susceptible plants. This additive component may confer useful levels of resistance in the absence of the major resistance gene. Greenhouse and field techniques are available for use in breeding programs, and resistant germplasm is available for developing commercial Erwinia resistant parental lines.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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