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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Livestock Performance on Seeded Cool-Season Forages

Authors
item Haferkamp, Marshall
item Grings, Elaine
item Heitschmidt, Rodney
item Macneil, Michael

Submitted to: Research Update for Fort Keogh Livestock and Range Research Laboratory
Publication Type: Popular Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: October 1, 2002
Publication Date: January 15, 2003
Repository URL: http://www.larrl.ars.usda.gov
Citation: HAFERKAMP, M.R., GRINGS, E.E., HEITSCHMIDT, R.K., MACNEIL, M.D. LIVESTOCK PERFORMANCE ON SEEDED COOL-SEASON FORAGES. RESEARCH UPDATE FOR FORT KEOGH LIVESTOCK AND RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY. p. 24-25. 2003.

Interpretive Summary: Seeding perennial cool-season grasses can be used to extend grazing seasons on rangelands. We evaluated yearling livestock performance and stand persistence of three released varieties of wheatgrasses seeded in the Northern Great Plains. We found livestock performance grazing these pastures in spring varied among the varieties. Gains were similar in 1997; gains were greater on Hycrest than Rosana in 1998; and gains were greater on Hycrest and Rosana than Luna in 1999. In 1 out of 3 years Hycrest crested wheatgrass provided more forage than Rosana western wheatgrass and would have allowed an increase in livestock numbers during spring. We also found that persistence of Luna pubescent wheatgrass is a problem in the 13 inch precipitation zone.

Technical Abstract: Seeding perennial cool-season grasses can be used to extend grazing seasons on rangelands. We evaluated yearling livestock performance and stand persistence of three released varieties of wheatgrasses seeded in the Northern Great Plains. We found livestock performance grazing these pastures in spring varied among the varieties. Gains were similar in 1997; gains were greater on Hycrest than Rosana in 1998; and gains were greater on Hycrest and Rosana than Luna in 1999. In 1 out of 3 years Hycrest crested wheatgrass provided more forage than Rosana western wheatgrass and would have allowed an increase in livestock numbers during spring. We also found that persistence of Luna pubescent wheatgrass is a problem in the 13 inch precipitation zone.

Last Modified: 8/30/2014
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