Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Evaluation of Experimental and Released Cool-Season Grass Varieties in the Northern Great Plains

Author
item Haferkamp, Marshall

Submitted to: Research Update for Fort Keogh Livestock and Range Research Laboratory
Publication Type: Popular Publication
Publication Acceptance Date: October 1, 2003
Publication Date: January 15, 2003
Repository URL: http://www.larrl.ars.usda.gov/publications.htm
Citation: HAFERKAMP, M.R. EVALUATION OF EXPERIMENTAL AND RELEASED COOL-SEASON GRASS VARIETIES IN THE NORTHERN GREAT PLAINS. RESEARCH UPDATE FOR FORT KEOGH LIVESTOCK AND RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY. p. 14-15. 2003.

Interpretive Summary: New and improved plant materials are continually needed to enhance seeding success, conserve natural resources following disturbances or wildfires, reclaim weed infested rangeland, and provide forage and habitat for livestock and wildlife. We have compared several native and introduced cool-season grasses for forage production in the Northern Great Plains. Seedings were planted in late fall 1994. By 1999, Swift, Mankota and RWR1831 Russian wildrye (Psathyrostachys juncea) were producing similar yields; Hycrest crested wheatgrass (Agropyron spp.) was more productive than Nordan; and Vavilov siberian wheatgrass (A. fragile) was more productive than P27. Similar yields were produced between Rodan and Rosana western wheatgrass (Pascopyron smithii), Goldar and BBP2 bluebunch wheatgrass (Pseudoroegneria spicata), and Secar and Snake 20 Snake river wheatgrass (Elymus wawawaiensis).

Technical Abstract: New and improved plant materials are continually needed to enhance seeding success, conserve natural resources following disturbances or wildfires, reclaim weed infested rangeland, and provide forage and habitat for livestock and wildlife. We have compared several native and introduced cool-season grasses for forage production in the Northern Great Plains. Seedings were planted in late fall 1994. By 1999, Swift, Mankota and RWR1831 Russian wildrye (Psathyrostachys juncea) were producing similar yields; Hycrest crested wheatgrass (Agropyron spp.) was more productive than Nordan; and Vavilov siberian wheatgrass (A. fragile) was more productive than P27. Similar yields were produced between Rodan and Rosana western wheatgrass (Pascopyron smithii), Goldar and BBP2 bluebunch wheatgrass (Pseudoroegneria spicata), and Secar and Snake 20 Snake river wheatgrass (Elymus wawawaiensis).

Last Modified: 7/30/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page