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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Saltcedar: Tamarix Ramosissima, T. Chinensis, T. Parviflora, T. Canariensis, T. Gallica, and Hybrids

Authors
item Deloach Jr, Culver
item Carruthers, Raymond

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: September 25, 2003
Publication Date: November 1, 2004
Citation: DeLoach, C.J., Carruthers, R.I. 2004. Saltcedar - Tamarix ramosissima, T. chinensis, T. parviflora, T. canariensis, T. gallica, and hybrids. In: Coombs, E.M., Clark, J.K., Piper, G.L., Cofrancesco Jr., A.F. Biological Control of Invasive Plants in the United States. Western Society of Weed Science. Corvallis, OR:Oregon State University Press. p. 311-316.

Interpretive Summary: Saltcedars are small trees from Eurasia that were introduced into the United States around 1823. They now infest most riparian ecosystems west of the 100th meridian. They cause great losses of water needed for agriculture and municipalities, and damage native plant communities and wildlife habitat, including the habitat of more than 40 endangered or threatened species. The unique biology of saltcedar makes it difficult to control by conventional means but makes it an ideal candidate for biological control. The first biological control insect, the leaf beetle Diorhabda elongata from Eurasia, was released experimentally in 6 western states in 1999 and 2000 and is already providing good control in some areas. Requests for additional experimental release sites, in 4 other western states, and general releases throughout all western states except Arizona are under consideration. Different biotypes of this beetle are being released in 2003 that promise control south of the 37th parallel. Control of saltcedar will allow the recovery of native plants and animals and salvaging water for agriculture, cities and native plants and animals).

Technical Abstract: Exotic, saltcedars native to Eurasia have invaded river valleys and lakeshores throughout the western United States, where they cause great losses of water needed for agriculture and municipalities and great damage to native plant and animal communities, including the habitat of many endangered species. Biological control is ideally suited to control invasive, exotic weeds in such areas and the first control agent, a leaf beetle from Eurasia, has been released in 6 western states, after extensive laboratory testing to insure its safety. This beetle is providing good control in some areas and newly introduced forms of the beetle promise control throughout the west, thus allowing the recovery of native plants and animals and salvaging water for agriculture, cities and native plants and animals.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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