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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Reducing Soil Spatial Variability by Site-Specific Manure Application

Authors
item Eghball, Bahman
item Shapiro, C - UNIV OF NE/LINCOLN
item Ginting, Daniel - UNIV OF NE/LINCOLN

Submitted to: Agronomy Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: July 21, 2003
Publication Date: November 1, 2003
Citation: EGHBALL, B., SHAPIRO, C.A., GINTING, D. 2003. REDUCING SOIL SPATIAL VARIABILITY BY SITE-SPECIFIC MANURE APPLICATION. AMERICAN SOCIETY OF AGRONOMY ABSTRACTS #771473.

Technical Abstract: Soil spatial variability can significantly influence crop performance. Manure, a renewable resource, is an excellent source of nutrients and C that can enhance physical and chemical properties of soils, especially infertile soils, hence reducing soil spatial variability. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of C and P in manure on spatial variability of soil C and P. Irrigated and rainfed studies were conducted with the treatments that included applications of site-specific beef and swine manure, uniform beef and swine manure, uniform commercial fertilizer, and a no treatment check to field strips in five years (1998 to 2002). For the site-specific treatment, manure was applied to areas within the field where organic C was less than 1.4% in the irrigated site and less than 1.6% in the rainfed site. In both studies, site-specific beef cattle or swine manure application resulted in greater soil C level and reduced soil C spatial variability as compared to synthetic fertilizer application or no treatment check. Soil C and P levels were significantly correlated. Spatial variability of soil P was reduced by as much as 51% when site-specific manure application was made. Site-specific manure application is a good method of improving less productive soils or sites within a field and reducing soil spatial variability.

Last Modified: 4/20/2014
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