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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Non-Invasive Assessment of Translucency in Pineapple Using X-Ray Imaging.

Authors
item Haff, Ronald
item Slaughter, David - UC DAVIS, CA
item Kader, Adel - UC DAVIS, CA

Submitted to: ASAE Annual International Meeting
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: July 27, 2003
Publication Date: July 27, 2003
Citation: Haff, R.P., Slaughter, D.C., Kader, A. 2003. Non-invasive assessment of translucency in pineapple using x-ray imaging. ASAE Annual International Meeting, July 27-30, 2003, Las Vegas, Nevada. 2003 CDROM.

Interpretive Summary: Fifty-one pineapples were x-rayed to determine whether a defect called translucency could be detected. After being x-rayed, each pineapple was cut open to determine the true level of the defect and rated on a scale from one (no translucency) to five (most translucency). The x-ray films were inspected by human subjects who rated them as either good or bad based on the appearance of translucent and non-translucent pineapples in training images. The results show a high correlation between the likelihood of a sample being rated as good and the actual condition of the fruit. Samples with no translucency were correctly identified 93% of the time, while those with extreme translucency were correctly identified 80% of the time. The results indicate that x-ray imaging is a useful method for selecting pineapples that are most likely to be free of translucency as well as those most likely to be extremely translucent.

Technical Abstract: Fifty-one pineapples were imaged with x-ray to determine whether a physiological disorder called translucency could be detected. After imaging, each pineapple was cut open to determine the true level of the disorder and rated on a scale from one (no translucency) to five (most translucency). The x-ray images were inspected by human subjects who evaluated them as either good or bad based on the appearance of translucent and non-translucent pineapples in training images. The results show a high correlation (R2 = 0.97) between the likelihood of a sample being rated as good and the actual condition of the fruit. Samples with no translucency were correctly identified 93% of the time, while those with extreme translucency were correctly identified 80% of the time. The results indicate that x-ray imaging is a useful method for selecting either pineapples that are most likely to be free of translucency or those that are most likely to be extremely translucent.

Last Modified: 4/23/2014
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