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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Defining a Multiple-Use Germplasm Collection for the Genus Trifolium

Authors
item Morris, John
item Greene, Stephanie

Submitted to: Crop Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 20, 2001
Publication Date: June 20, 2001
Citation: Morris, J.B., S.L. Greene. 2001. Defining a multiple-use germplasm collection forthe genus Trifolium. Crop Sci. 41:893-901

Interpretive Summary: This paper reviews the current composition of the USDA National Trifolium germplasm collection and concludes that the collection is not diverse enough to meet the needs of multiple-use. The collection is strongly biased towards the two major cultivated red and white clover species, which make up 56% of the collection. Although many wild species are represented in the collection representation is poor for species considered gene sources for the cultivated species and for species with minor uses. The objectives of this paper are to demonstrate how the collection can be diversified to better serve users and contribute to the conservation of the genus. Reflecting priorities proposed in the 1970's the scope was defined as containing all species within the genus Trifolium. Next a broad gene-pool model was defined on the basis of ease of intraspecific hybridization and the history of crop use. Areas in the model were then identified that required more accessions to represent diversity of specific interest to users, or that were vulnerable to erosion or extinction.

Technical Abstract: An effective germplasm collection provides genetic variation useful to crop improvement, botanical research and conservation of plant biodiversity. The USDA National Trifolium germplasm collection currently limits the collection's effectiveness in serving multiple uses. Reflecting the mandate of plant introduction, the collection is strongly biased towards the two major cultivated red and white clover species, which make up 56% of the collection. Although many wild species are represented in the collection representation is poor for species considered gene sources for the cultivated species and for species with minor uses. The objectives of this paper are to demonstrate how the collection can be diversified to better serve users and contribute to the conservation of the genus. Reflecting priorities proposed in the 1970's the scope was defined as containing all species within the genus Trifolium. Next a broad gene-pool model was defined on the basis of ease of intraspecific hybridization and the history of crop use. Areas in the model were then identified that required more accessions to represent diversity of specific interest to users, or that were vulnerable to erosion or extinction.

Last Modified: 11/25/2014
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