Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Food Oils Reduce Postharvest Pitting and Influence the Storage Quality of Grapefruit

Authors
item Dou, Hauting - FL DEPT OF CITRUS, CREC
item Hagenmaier, Robert
item Ju, Zhigou - FORMER USDA EMPLOYEE
item Curry, Eric

Submitted to: Proceedings of Florida State Horticultural Society
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: October 1, 2002
Publication Date: February 1, 2003
Citation: DOU, H., HAGENMAIER, R.D., JU, Z., CURRY, E.A. FOOD OILS REDUCE POSTHARVEST PITTING AND INFLUENCE THE STORAGE QUALITY OF GRAPEFRUIT. PROCEEDINGS OF FLORIDA STATE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY. 2003. v. 115. p. 283-287.

Interpretive Summary: One of the problems with room-temperature storage of Marsh grapefruit is the development of surface defects, called pitting. Treatment of citrus fruit with various oily products sometimes reduced the extent of pitting. For example, dipping the fruit in soybean oil reduced postharvest pitting substantially, with no increase in decay. However, mixing soybean oil with a shellac formulation did not reduce pitting. These studies suggest that pitting may be reduced with vegetable oils, depending on the procedure.

Technical Abstract: The effect of various food oils in reducing postharvest pitting of white `Marsh' grapefruit was studied. Little postharvest pitting in fruit treated with soybean, canola, or corn oil and then waxed with shellac wax. Petroleum oil, shellac wax, or shellac wax containing 10% vegetable oil significantly increased pitting of grapefruit. Oil-wax emulsions did not improve the reduction of pitting. These studies indicate that application of food oils can successfully control postharvest pitting of white `Marsh' grapefruit under some conditions.

Last Modified: 12/24/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page