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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Diversity of Garlic Accessions Within the National Plant Germplasm System

Authors
item Volk, Gayle
item Henk, Adam
item Richards, Christopher

Submitted to: HortScience
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: January 20, 2003
Publication Date: March 20, 2003
Citation: Volk, G.M., Henk, A.D., Richards, C.M. 2003. Diversity of garlic accessions within the national plant germplasm system. HortScience. 2003. 38:736.

Interpretive Summary: Garlic (Allium sativum L.) has been clonally propagated for hundreds of years because it does not produce seed under cultivated conditions. A single garlic accession frequently displays a high degree of phenotypic plasticity that is likely dependent upon soil type, moisture, and cultural practices. This diversity observed by growers has occasionally led to the renaming of varieties as they are exchanged among growers and gardeners. As a result, there are numerous garlic varieties available within the USDA National Plant Germplasm System and commercially that are very similar genetically, yet have unique varietal names. We have performed amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis on more than 200 accessions within the NPGS as well as many commercially available varieties to determine the extent of accession duplication among cultivated garlics. These data can be used to determine phylogenetic relationships among garlic varieties. Growers can also use these data to identify unique accessions within the NPGS that could be provided to the garlic growing community.

Technical Abstract: Garlic (Allium sativum L.) has been clonally propagated for hundreds of years because it does not produce seed under cultivated conditions. A single garlic accession frequently displays a high degree of phenotypic plasticity that is likely dependent upon soil type, moisture, and cultural practices. This diversity observed by growers has occasionally led to the renaming of varieties as they are exchanged among growers and gardeners. As a result, there are numerous garlic varieties available within the USDA National Plant Germplasm System and commercially that are very similar genetically, yet have unique varietal names. We have performed amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis on more than 200 accessions within the NPGS as well as many commercially available varieties to determine the extent of accession duplication among cultivated garlics. These data can be used to determine phylogenetic relationships among garlic varieties. Growers can also use these data to identify unique accessions within the NPGS that could be provided to the garlic growing community.

Last Modified: 7/24/2014
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