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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Bioavailability of Ascorbyl-2-Monophosphate to Channel Catfish Fed Purified and Practical Diets.

Authors
item Sealey, Wendy - TEXAS A&M UNIV.
item Gaylord, Thomas
item Gatlin, Delbert - TEXAS A&M UNIV.
item Anderson, Stewart - LAROCHE, VITAMINS

Submitted to: Journal of the World Aquaculture Society
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 16, 2001
Publication Date: June 1, 2002
Citation: SEALEY, W.M., GAYLORD, T.G., GATLIN, D.M., ANDERSON, S.J. BIOAVAILABILITY OF ASCORBYL-2-MONOPHOSPHATE TO CHANNEL CATFISH FED PURIFIED AND PRACTICAL DIETS.. JOURNAL OF THE WORLD AQUACULTURE SOCIETY. 2002. v.33. p.209-313.

Interpretive Summary: Vitamin C has received considerable attention in fish nutrition because ascorbic acid is one of the more labile water-soluble vitamins, due to its sensitivity to heat and moisture. Therefore, the present study was conducted to determine the bioavailability of ascorbyl-2-monophosphate (Stay-C® 35) to channel catfish, and the potential effect of purified and practical diet composition. No difference of vitamin C form or effect of diet type was seen on either the fish's ability to absorb or utilize vitamin C. The current study suggests that Stay-C® 35 is as available as pure crystalline ascorbic acid to channel catfish as observed in several earlier studies. In addition, differences in diet composition (and manufacturing procedures) did not alter the ability of channel catfish to metabolize a standardized dose of vitamin C from the monophosphate form.

Technical Abstract: Vitamin C has received considerable attention in fish nutrition because ascorbic acid is one of the more labile water-soluble vitamins, due to its sensitivity to heat and moisture. Therefore, the present study was conducted to determine the bioavailability of ascorbyl-2-monophosphate to channel catfish, and the potential effect of purified and practical diet composition. After administration of the gelatin capsule, plasma ascorbate concentrations increased substantially from baseline at the first sampling time (2 h) and peaked around 4 h. At each sampling point, there were no differences in plasma ascorbate levels of fish subjected to the three treatments. There were no significant (P>0.05) differences among the estimated pharmacokinetic parameters. Ascorbic acid, regardless of source (phosphorylated versus pure crystalline) showed a very rapid, i.e. no time lag, uptake, with a half-life of approximately 1 h or less. There was a significant difference among the AUCs of the different treatments, with the purified/Stay-C® 35 treatment being significantly lower that the other two treatments. This differed with the pharmacokinetic analysis, which suggests no difference in ascorbate metabolism, regardless of source and diet type. The current study suggests that Stay-C® 35 is as available as pure crystalline ascorbic acid to channel catfish as observed in several earlier studies. In addition, differences in diet composition (and manufacturing procedures) did not alter the ability of channel catfish to metabolize a standardized dose of vitamin C from the monophosphate form.

Last Modified: 8/21/2014
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