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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Use of Fructooligosaccharide to Prevent Rapid Salmonella Infection in Market Weight Swine

Authors
item Levis, I - IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Hurd, Howard
item Mckean, J - IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Gailey, Jared
item Larsen, S - IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Harbaugh, Ellen
item Griffith, R - IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Research Workers in Animal Diseases Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: November 12, 2002
Publication Date: November 12, 2002
Citation: LEVIS, I.M., HURD, H.S., MCKEAN, J.D., GAILEY, J.K., LARSEN, S.T., HARBAUGH, E., GRIFFITH, R.W. USE OF FRUCTOOLIGOSACCHARIDE TO PREVENT RAPID SALMONELLA INFECTION IN MARKET WEIGHT SWINE. CONFERENCE OF RESEARCH WORKERS IN ANIMAL DISEASES. 2002. ABSTRACT P. 54P.

Technical Abstract: The objective of this study was to determine if adding fructooligosaccharide (FOS) to the diet of swine pre-slaughter would decrease the number of Salmonella present in the intestinal contents and tissues at slaughter. Previous work has indicated that many pigs become infected with Salmonella through acute exposure to contaminated holding pens at slaughter plants. Fructooligosaccharides have been demonstrated to enhance the growth of intestinal lactic acid bacteria which, in turn, help prevent colonization with a variety of pathogenic bacteria, including Salmonella. Forty-eight market-weight swine were administered 0.75% FOS through the water line for 4 days prior to euthanasia and necropsy. On the day of euthanasia the swine were exposed to a pen floor contaminated with approximately 10**6 nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium per gram of feces. The pigs were euthanized at 2, 3, and 4 hours following exposure. Ileocecal lymph nodes, distal ileum sections, cecal contents, and rectal contents were cultured for the nalidixic acid-resistant S. enterica serovar Typhimurium. There were no differences in the number of positive intestinal samples between pigs receiving FOS and controls. However, the infection rates of ileocecal lymph nodes were decreased in those pigs receiving FOS in their diets.

Last Modified: 8/29/2014
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