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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Qualitative Genetics

Authors
item Palmer, Reid
item Pfeiffer, Todd - UNIV OF KENTUCKY
item Buss, Glenn - VIRGINIA POLYTECHNIC
item Kilen, Thomas

Submitted to: Crop Science Society of America Monograph
Publication Type: Monograph
Publication Acceptance Date: July 29, 2003
Publication Date: January 9, 2004
Citation: PALMER, R.G., PFEIFFER, T.W., BUSS, G.R., KILEN, T.C. QUALITATIVE GENETICS. CROP SCIENCE SOCIETY OF AMERICA MONOGRAPH. 2004. SPECT, J.E. AND BOERNA, H.R., EDITORS. MADISON, WI. P. 137-234.

Interpretive Summary: Qualitative genetics, also known as Mendelian genetics or transmission genetics refers to those genetic traits that have a distinct appearance (phenotype) and are controlled by one or several genes. Examples are disease resistance, morphological traits, etc. In soybean, more than 300 qualitative genetic traits are known and are maintained in the USDA Genetic Type Collection. This chapter is included in the third edition of the Soybean Monograph and summarizes existing literature and highlights new information on soybean qualitative genetics with an emphasis on publications and data reported since the second edition (1986). The 15 tables will be inclusive extending information provided in the first edition (1973). Qualitative genetics are important for plant breeders, pathologists, physiologists, and all scientists who attempt to improve soybean. The principal users will be scientists, extension service people, and graduate students who need both historical and up-to-date (2003) information on soybean qualitative genetics.

Technical Abstract: Qualitative genetics, also known as Mendelian genetics or transmission genetics refers to those genetic traits that have a distinct phenotype, and are controlled by one or several genes. More than 300 qualitative genetic traits are known and are maintained in the USDA soybean Genetic Type Collection. Detailed explanations of the genetics, pathology, virology, physiology, etc. are given in the text. The tables contain the gene symbol, a brief phenotypic description, the strain containing the mutation, and the relevant references. Of particular economic interest is the table on seed fatty acid mutants where variations exist that affect the food, feed, and industrial uses. Qualitative genetics are important for plant breeders, pathologists, physiologists, and all scientists who attempt to improve soybean. The principal users will be scientists, extension service people, and graduate students who need both historical and up-to-date (2003) information on soybean qualitative genetics.

Last Modified: 11/26/2014
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