Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Research to Meet Agriculture-Conservation Information Needs

Author
item Steiner, Jeffrey

Submitted to: Proceedings of the Canadian Forage and Turf Seed Conference
Publication Type: Trade Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 31, 2002
Publication Date: December 31, 2002
Citation: STEINER, J.J. RESEARCH TO MEET AGRICULTURE-CONSERVATION INFORMATION NEEDS. PROCEEDINGS OF THE CANADIAN FORAGE AND TURF SEED CONFERENCE. 2002.

Interpretive Summary: An integrated research approach can be helpful problem solving tool when simple experiments cannot provide all the information needed to answer complex concerns about the impacts of agriculture on natural resource conservation. A series of on-farm research experiments has provided information detailing the effects of conventional and conservation production practices has provided industry the necessary tools to manage grass seed crops in ways that increase profitability while enhancing water quality. Building on a series of earlier experiments, a systems research approach has been extended to include wildlife biologists to help determine the direct impacts of production practices on aquatic wildlife that utilize drainages near grass seed fields during winter high flow periods. Results from this research are providing farmers, USDA-NRCS field offices, university extension agents, and soil & water conservation districts science-based information to help enhance salmonid and other native fish habitat quality.

Technical Abstract: An integrated research approach can be helpful problem solving tool when simple experiments cannot provide all the information needed to answer complex concerns about the impacts of agriculture on natural resource conservation. A series of on-farm research experiments has provided information detailing the effects of conventional and conservation production practices has provided industry the necessary tools to manage grass seed crops in ways that increase profitability while enhancing water quality. Building on a series of earlier experiments, a systems research approach has been extended to include wildlife biologists to help determine the direct impacts of production practices on aquatic wildlife that utilize drainages near grass seed fields during winter high flow periods. Results from this research are providing farmers, USDA-NRCS field offices, university extension agents, and soil & water conservation districts science-based information to help enhance salmonid and other native fish habitat quality.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page