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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Cucurbit yellow vine disease: A threat to the cucurbit industry?

Authors
item Pair, Sammy
item Bruton, Benny
item Mitchell, F. - TEXAS AGRIC. EXPT. STATIO
item Fletcher, J. - OKLAHOMA STATE UNIV.
item Wayadande, A. - OKLAHOMA STATE UNIV.
item Melcher, U. - OKLAHOMA STATE UNIV.
item Davis, Angela

Submitted to: Georgia Vegetable and Small Fruit Conference and Trade Show Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: December 30, 2002
Publication Date: January 10, 2003
Citation: Pair, S.D., Bruton, B.D., Mitchell, F., Fletcher, J. Wayadande, A., Melcher, U. and Davis, A. Cucurbit yellow vine disease: A threat to the cucurbit industry? Proceeding of 2003 Southeastern Regional Vegetable Conference. 2003. p. 41-44.

Interpretive Summary: Cucurbits, primarily watermelon, cantaloupe, squash and pumpkin are important horticultural crops in the south central region of the U.S. that are affected by a variety of insect and disease complexes. Cucurbit yellow vine disease (CYVD) is a newly described disease that affects cucurbits in Texas and Oklahoma, but also has been confirmed in Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas and Nebraska, Tennessee, and Massachusetts. It is caused by a bacterium that is transmitted by insects. CYVD affected plants usually exhibit stunting, yellowing, and gradual decline beginning about 10 to14 days prior to harvest. Losses can range from less than 5% to 100% in affected fields of watermelon, squash, pumpkin, and cantaloupe. Squash and pumpkin are most susceptible to CYVD. Early-planted watermelons targeted for the 4th of July market generally are impacted more severely than later plantings. We have demonstrated that the squash bug is a vector of the CYVD bacterium. Furthermore, the insect can carry the bacterium through the winter and transmit the following spring. The proportion of squash bugs in a field that can transmit the bacterium may vary greatly. Historically, squash bugs prefer squash and pumpkin as hosts and have been serious pests of these crops in Texas and Oklahoma. In contrast to other production areas, squash bugs have become an increasing concern for growers of watermelon and cantaloupe in Texas and Oklahoma Squash bug. We have received more and more reports that suggest CYVD is either spreading or gone undetected in other regions. Consequently, there is a need to educate growers, extension, and industry on the seriousness of CYVD and ways to reduce losses in susceptible cucurbit crops.

Technical Abstract: Cucurbits, primarily watermelon, cantaloupe, squash and pumpkin are important horticultural crops in the south central region of the U.S. that are affected by a variety of insect and disease complexes. Cucurbit yellow vine disease (CYVD) is a newly described disease that affects cucurbits in Texas and Oklahoma, but also has been confirmed in Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas and Nebraska, Tennessee, and Massachusetts. It is caused by a bacterium that is transmitted by insects. CYVD affected plants usually exhibit stunting, yellowing, and gradual decline beginning about 10 to14 days prior to harvest. Losses can range from less than 5% to 100% in affected fields of watermelon, squash, pumpkin, and cantaloupe. Squash and pumpkin are most susceptible to CYVD. Early-planted watermelons targeted for the 4th of July market generally are impacted more severely than later plantings. We have demonstrated that the squash bug is a vector of the CYVD bacterium. Furthermore, the insect can carry the bacterium through the winter and transmit the following spring. The proportion of squash bugs in a field that can transmit the bacterium may vary greatly. Historically, squash bugs prefer squash and pumpkin as hosts and have been serious pests of these crops in Texas and Oklahoma. In contrast to other production areas, squash bugs have become an increasing concern for growers of watermelon and cantaloupe in Texas and Oklahoma Squash bug. We have received more and more reports that suggest CYVD is either spreading or gone undetected in other regions. Consequently, there is a need to educate growers, extension, and industry on the seriousness of CYVD and ways to reduce losses in susceptible cucurbit crops.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
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