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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Ft-Ir Microspectroscopic Mapping of the Effects of Enzymatic Treatment of Flax

Authors
item Himmelsbach, David
item Khalili, Sadia - ROYAL INST TECHNOL SWEDEN
item Akin, Danny

Submitted to: Federation of Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy Societies Final Program
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: December 31, 2002
Publication Date: December 31, 2002
Citation: HIMMELSBACH, D.S., KHALILI, S., AKIN, D.E. FT-IR MICROSPECTROSCOPIC MAPPING OF THE EFFECTS OF ENZYMATIC TREATMENT OF FLAX. THE 29TH FEDERATION OF ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY AND SPECTROSCOPY SOCIETIES FINAL PROGRAM. 2002. ABSTRACT NO. 382. P. 155.

Technical Abstract: FT-IR microspectroscopic mapping was investigated as a tool to study the effects of enzyme retting of flax stems. FT-IR mapping permitted the elucidation of the relative loss or changes in the distribution of key chemical components, after treatment with enzymes or enzyme/chelator mixtures in association with visible changes in structure. Cross-sections of Ariane flax stems were treated with SP249 (a pectinase-rich enzyme mixture) at 0.05%, 0.07% or 0.10% v/v concentration in a pH 5 acetate buffer for 6 hr at 40C. Flax stems treated 0.05% and 0.07% v/v concentration of SP249 with 50 mM oxalic acid as a chelator were also mapped. The results indicated that treatment with the 0.05% SP249 alone was ineffective in releasing fiber bundles from the surrounding tissue. The release of fiber bundles was increased by the addition of 50 mM oxalic acid. However, the IR spectra of the bundles indicated that insoluble oxalate salt remained on the tissue after this treatment. Increasing the concentration of the SP249 to 0.07% v/v plus 50 mM oxalic acid was effective in releasing the fiber bundles and generating some ultimate (individual) fibers with no detectable oxalate or pectate salt residues. Increasing the SP249 concentration to 0.10% v/v without using oxalic acid was effective in separating fiber bundles into ultimate fibers, leaving no pectate salt residue and only a trace of pectic esters and/or acids. The use of FT-IR mapping is shown to have extreme advantages over visible imaging alone in that it can detect and locate the chemical species present after each treatment in relation to the anatomical features of the flax stem. The use of the technique is this manner is finding application in the study of the effects of enzymatic treatment of many other natural fiber materials providing a guide to setting up large

Last Modified: 10/21/2014
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