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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: A Microcantalever-Based Pathogen Detector

Authors
item Weeks, B. - UC-LAWRENCE LIVERMORE LAB
item Camarero, J. - UC-LAWRENCE LIVERMORE LAB
item Noy, A. - UC-LAWRENCE LIVERMORE LAB
item Miller, A.E. - UC-LAWRENCE LIVERMORE LAB
item STANKER, LARRY
item DE Yoreo, J.J. - UC-LAWRENCE LIVERMPRE LAB

Submitted to: Symposium Proceedings of Nanotechnology Conference 2003
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: February 23, 2003
Publication Date: February 23, 2003
Citation: Weeks, B.L., Camarero, J., Noy, A., Miller, A., Stanker, L.H., De Yoreo, J. 2003. A microcantalever-based pathogen detector. Symposium Proceedings of Nanotechnology Conference 2003.

Interpretive Summary: The ability to detect small amounts of materials, especially bacterial organisms, is important for medical diagnostics and national security issues. Engineered micro-mechanical systems provide one approach for constructing multifunctional, highly sensitive, real-time, immunospecific biological detectors. We present qualitative detection of specific Salmonella strains using a functionalized silicon nitride microcantilever. Detection is achieved due to a change in the surface stress on the cantilever surface in-situ upon binding of a small number of becteria. Scanning electron micrographs indicate that less than 25 adsorbed bacteria are required for detection.

Technical Abstract: The ability to detect small amounts of materials, especially bacterial organisms, is important for medical diagnostics and national security issues. Engineered micro-mechanical systems provide one approach for constructing multifunctional, highly sensitive, real-time, immunospecific biological detectors. We present qualitative detection of specific Salmonella strains using a functionalized silicon nitride microcantilever. Detection is achieved due to a change in the surface stress on the cantilever surface in-situ upon binding of a small number of becteria. Scanning electron micrographs indicate that less than 25 adsorbed bacteria are required for detection.

Last Modified: 9/29/2014
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