Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Genomics of the Mycotoxin Producing Fungus, Fusarium Graminearum (Gibberella Zeae)

Authors
item Trail, F - MICHIGAN STATE UNIV
item Xu, J - PURDUE UNIVERSITY
item San Miguel, P - PURDUE UNIVERSITY
item Kistler, H

Submitted to: Mycopathologia
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: March 6, 2002
Publication Date: August 1, 2002
Citation: TRAIL, F., XU, J.R., SAN MIGUEL, P., KISTLER, H.C. GENOMICS OF THE MYCOTOXIN PRODUCING FUNGUS, FUSARIUM GRAMINEARUM (GIBBERELLA ZEAE). MYCOPATHOLOGIA. 2002.

Technical Abstract: Fusarium graminearum (sexual state: Gibberella zeae) causes head blight (also known as scab) of wheat, barley, and oats, as well as foot and crown rot of corn. A genomics approach to the study of F. graminearum is critical because for head blight, like many Fusarium diseases, effective fungicides and highly resistant plant varieties are not available. A better understanding of the biology of the scab organism is warranted to develop new control strategies. Our long term goals are: (1) to understand the genetic basis for inoculum development, mycotoxin production, and pathogenicity; and (2) to use genomics to develop a biology-based control program for scab, using the genomics programs of wheat and corn to enhance this project. We have sequenced and analyzed a cohort of over 10,000 ESTs from three cDNA libraries representing different culture conditions and developmental stages of the fungus. From an input of 10,281 EST sequences, 1,200 contigs and 1,315 singleton sequences were obtained. Therefore, the estimated number of genes identified by our current EST database is 2,515. These efforts are a prelude to the whole genome sequencing of one strain of F. graminearum. Genome sequencing not only provides the most complete description of an organism's biological processes and metabolic capability but also provides direct access to the reagents needed for subsequent functional studies. For every organism sequenced to date, research has instantly shifted from local gene-based approaches to more global, genomic approaches. This project will also provide useful information to scientists working with other Fusarium species or other fungi for comparative studies of fungal morphogenesis, development, and pathogenesis.

Last Modified: 7/23/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page