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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Mediation of Host Selection and Oviposition Behavior in the Diamondback Moth Plutella Xylostella and Its Predator Chrysoperla Carnea by Chemical Cues from Cole Crops

Authors
item Reddy, G.V.P - UNIV. OF GUAM
item Tabone, E - INRA ANTIBES FRANCE
item Smith, Michael

Submitted to: Biological Control
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: July 10, 2003
Publication Date: January 15, 2004
Repository URL: http://www.ars.usda.gov/sp2UserFiles/Place/19260000/MTSmith/MTS03.pdf
Citation: Reddy, G.V.P., E. Tabone and M.T. Smith. 2004. Mediation of host selection and oviposition behavior in the diamondback moth Plutella xylostella and its predator Chrysoperla carnea by chemical cues from cole crops. Biological Control 29(2): 270-277

Interpretive Summary: The diamondback moth (DBM) is the most important pest of cultivated brassicas worldwide, feeding on all plants in the mustard family, cole crops, and on several green house plants. Because of the widespread use of insecticides to control DBM, it has developed resistance to numerous insecticides, including several Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) products. Therefore development of alternative non-pesticidal control strategies is needed. Chrysoperla spp. lacewings are considered to be one of the most effective generalist predators, feeding on eggs and young caterpillars, aphids, spider mites, scales, psylla, mealybugs, whiteflies, thrips, leafhoppers and other soft-bodied prey. Therefore, a known predator of DBM, Chrysoperla carnea, and the DBM were studied in response to four different brassica host plants: cabbage, cauliflower, kohlrabi and broccoli. Results from laboratory wind tunnel studies indicated that female DBM and C. carnea orient towards cabbage and cauliflower, while male do not. In no-choice tests, oviposition by DBM did not differ significantly among the test plants, while C. carnea laid significantly more eggs on cabbage, cauliflower and broccoli than on kohlrabi. However in free-choice tests, egg/laying by DBM was significantly greater on cabbage, followed by cauliflower, broccoli and kohlrabi, while C. carnea preferred to oviposit on cabbage and cauliflower, followed by broccoli and kohlrabi. The predation rates of DBM by C. carnea on kohlrabi and broccoli were not significantly different from one another, but were significantly higher than that on cabbage and cauliflower. When two types of plant, intact and injured, were available to adult DBM, female oviposition was significantly greater on injured plant leaves than on intact plants leaves. Similarly, C. carnea oviposition was significantly greater on injured plant leaves than on intact leaves. Implications regarding the possible role of green leaf volatiles in host selection/preference, as well as in tritophic interactions, are discussed.

Technical Abstract: Host plant mediated orientational and ovipositional behavior of diamondback moth (DBM) Plutella xylostella (L.) (DBM) and its predator Chrysoperla carnea were studied in response to four different brassica host plants: cabbage, (Brassica oleracea L. subs. capitata), cauliflower (B. oleracea L. sub. botrytis), kohlrabi (B. oleracea L. subs. gongylodes) and broccoli (B. oleracea L. subs. italica). Results from laboratory wind tunnel studies indicated that orientation of female DBM and C. carnea towards cabbage and cauliflower was significantly greater than towards broccoli and kohlrabi plants. However, male DBM and C. carnea did not orient towards any of the host plants. In no-choice tests, oviposition by DBM did not differ significantly among the test plants, while C. carnea layed significantly more eggs on cabbage, cauliflower and broccoli than on kohlrabi. However in free-choice tests, oviposition by DBM was significantly greater on cabbage, followed by cauliflower, broccoli and kohlrabi, while C. carnea preferred to oviposit on cabbage and cauliflower, followed by broccoli and kohlrabi. The predation rates of DBM by C. carnea on kohlrabi and broccoli were not significantly different from one another, but were significantly higher than that on cabbage and cauliflower. When two types of plant, intact and injured, were available to adult DBM, female oviposition was significantly greater on injured plant leaves than on intact plants leaves. Similarly, C. carnea oviposition was significantly greater on injured plant leaves than on intact leaves. Implications regarding the possible role of green leaf volatiles in host selection/preference, as well as in tritophic interactions, are discussed.

Last Modified: 7/30/2014
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