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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Allelic Polymorphism in the Promoter Region of the Sucrose Synthase-2 Gene in the Genus Saccharum

Authors
item Lingle, Sarah
item Dyer, John

Submitted to: American Association for the Advancement of Science Meeting
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: December 28, 2002
Publication Date: February 13, 2003
Citation: Lingle, S.E., Dyer, J.M. 2003. Allelic Polymorphism in the Promoter Region of the Sucrose Synthase-2 Gene in the Genus Saccharum [abstract]. 2003 Annual Meeting Poster Presentations Guide. American Association for the Advancement of Science Annual Meeting. February 13 - 18, 2003, Denver, Colorado. p. A113.

Technical Abstract: Sucrose synthase (EC 2.4.1.13) is an important enzyme of sucrose metabolism in sugarcane (Saccharum sp. hybrids). One of the genes for sucrose synthase (Sus2) is more highly expressed in sucrose-storing genotypes than low sucrose S. spontaneum genotypes. We amplified and cloned the promoter region for the Sus2 gene (homologous to maize Sh1) from 'Muntok Java' (MJ), a sucrose-storing hybrid of S. officinarum and S. spontaneum, and 'PIN84-1' (PIN), a low-sucrose S. spontaneum. Four clones were sequenced from each genotype. All four MJ clones were different, and there were two distinct clones in PIN. Differences were characterized by large inserts of about 240 base pairs that were highly homologous to regions of the candystripe1 transposon in sorghum or the tourist-type transposon. There were five different inserts, designated A through E. All of the sequenced clones had at least one of the inserts, and one clone had two inserts. One of the inserts, designated B, was present in both types of clone from PIN, while inserts A and E were found only in MJ clones. We speculate that Insert B could be used as a marker for the S. spontaneum form, while Inserts A and E may represent the S. officinarum form. While it is not yet known if any of these inserts influence transcription of the gene, these sequence differences may be useful for the selection of the highly expressed form of the gene.

Last Modified: 10/26/2014
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