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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Comparative Growth, Survival, Yield, and Processing Traits of Nwac103 and Commercial Channel Catfish Strains

Authors
item Wolters, William
item Bosworth, Brian
item Bates, Terry
item Heikes, D - UAPB

Submitted to: Catfish Farmers of America Research Symposium
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: December 14, 2002
Publication Date: February 21, 2003
Citation: Wolters, W.R., Bosworth, B.G., Bates, T.D., Heikes, D. 2003. Comparative growth, survival, yield, and processing traits of NWAC103 and commercial channel catfish strains. 2003 Catfish Farmers of America Research Symposium, February 21, 2003. Abstract 11.

Technical Abstract: USDA103 catfish were developed at the USDA/ARS Catfish Genetics Research Unit and jointly evaluated and released to commercial producers in cooperation with Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station as NWAC103 line catfish. Experimental trials have shown NWAC103 catfish have 10-20% better growth compared to other catfish currently being used by producers. However, additional production information is needed in the areas of fingerling production and fingerling stocking densities required to obtain marketable size fish in less than two years. A study was conducted to compare fry to fingerling and fingerling to market size production of NWAC103 line catfish to commercial strain. Eight 1.0-acre earthen ponds were stocked with fry from both strains at 100,000/acre (4 replicate ponds/strain) and fed finely ground feed (40% protein) 2-3 times daily (20-30 lbs/acre/day) until fish were observed feeding at the pond surface. Fish were then fed a floating pellet (35% protein) to satiation daily, harvested after approximately 280 days, and graded into three size classes (<5", >5"-7", and >7") using a floating in-pond grader. Fish number, average size, and total weight were recorded for the size classes, and feed conversion and survival calculated. Analysis showed significant differences between strains for yield, feed consumption, and fish number for the <5" and >7" size classes, but no differences for feed conversion or survival. The second production year evaluated fingerling to market size growth and production. Fingerlings from both lines graded into the larger size class (>7" and approximately 80 lbs/1000) were restocked into the same 1-acre ponds at 5,000 fish/acre. Fish were fed to satiation daily with a 28% protein diet and harvested in the fall of 2002. Survival, average size, yield and processing data were obtained for the two strains. The goal of the second year's study is to produce a fish with an acceptable market size in <2 years and obtain comparative data on survival, feed consumption, and yield for the two lines.USDA103 catfish were developed at the USDA/ARS Catfish Genetics Research Unit and jointly evaluated and released to commercial producers in cooperation with Mississippi Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station as NWAC103 line catfish. Experimental trials have shown NWAC103 catfish have 10-20% better growth compared to other catfish currently being used by producers. However, additional production information is needed in the areas of fingerling production and fingerling stocking densities required to obtain marketable size fish in less than two years. A study was conducted to compare fry to fingerling and fingerling to market size production of NWAC103 line catfish to commercial strain. Eight 1.0-acre earthen ponds were stocked with fry from both strains at 100,000/acre (4 replicate ponds/strain) and fed finely ground feed (40% protein) 2-3 times daily (20-30 lbs/acre/day) until fish were observed feeding at the pond surface. Fish were then fed a floating pellet (35% protein) to satiation daily, harvested after approximately 280 days, and graded into three size classes (<5", >5"-7", and >7") using a floating in-pond grader. Fish number, average size, and total weight were recorded for the size classes, and feed conversion and survival calculated. Analysis showed significant differences between strains for yield, feed consumption, and fish number for the <5" and >7" size classes, but no differences for feed conversion or survival. The second production year evaluated fingerling to market size growth and production. Fingerlings from both lines graded into the larger size class (>7" and approximately 80 lbs/1000) were restocked into the same 1-acre ponds at 5,000 fish/acre. Fish were fed to satiation daily with a 28% protein diet and harvested in the fall of 2002. Survival, average size, yield and processing data were obtained for the two strains. The goal of the second year's study is to produce a fish with an acceptable market size in <2 years and obtain comparative data on survival, feed consumption, and yield for the two lines.

Last Modified: 10/30/2014
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